Props any tips for hardening weapons

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Carpathia

Sr Member
Resin the outside and let that cure (about 3 or 4 hours to fully cure). Then, cut a hole about 1" wide, pour in some thin, fast-curing rondo, slush that around until it stops slushing and seal up your hole. Let the rondo cure. Your weapon will feel very hot for a while as the rondo cures When the heat stops, it's probably safe to start working with, but I would recommend waiting about 12 hours. After that, you can finish your weapon in any way you see fit (ie. bondoing the exterior to clean up some areas, or just go onto sanding and painting).
 
Hey carpathia, what ratio do you use to get "thin rondo"?

I'm going to need to use it soon to harden the inside of my gun and I've never used it before. I know there's a lot of different ratios people use but I figure since you've used it for a gun before (at least I'm assuming you used it for your reach assault rifle) you might know what works. I just don't want to make it, put it in, find out its too thick, and not have it slush around enough/waste all of it.

thanks
 

Guilhermebtbj1

New Member
I was planning on using only resin inside to make solid pieces
It is solid after a while and very easy to pour inside since its liquid at first
What do you think?
I will post pics with the result as soon as i try it
 

Carpathia

Sr Member
Hey carpathia, what ratio do you use to get "thin rondo"?

I'm going to need to use it soon to harden the inside of my gun and I've never used it before. I know there's a lot of different ratios people use but I figure since you've used it for a gun before (at least I'm assuming you used it for your reach assault rifle) you might know what works. I just don't want to make it, put it in, find out its too thick, and not have it slush around enough/waste all of it.

thanks

For this sort of application, I would recommend 60/40 ratio. 60% bondo, 40% resin. And to make it fast-curing, put in a generous amount of both the cream hardener for the bondo and the liquid hardener for the resin. Just for reference, when I use a 16oz plastic cup and I make this sort of rondo, I fill the cup up a little over half way with bondo, fill the cup up to about the 7/8 level with resin, mixe the two until you have a consistent blend, then add a four inch line of the cream hardener and a 2 second spray of the liquid hardener, mix very well and use very quickly.

Edit: By the way, I just noticed that this was sort of a necro-post, you could have just PMed me this question.
 
Thanks that helps.


Edit: By the way, I just noticed that this was sort of a necro-post, you could have just PMed me this question.[/QUOTE]

yea I didn't notice. But this can help other people too, not just me, so its honestly not bad in my opinion.
 

max

New Member
This was actually very beneficial to me. I did not know that bondo and resin were the same thing and that rondo was aptly names because of the combination. Even more importantly you posted a mini-tutorial, so now I feel confident in doing it myself. Thank you.
 
This may be just me, but I see a lot of misinformation in this thread. Using 60% bondo for this application is WAY too much. I used a 50/50 mix to finish my pieces and I would say even that is too thick for sloshing around inside a weapon. Also, as I mentioned, I use Rondo to finish all my armor pieces, and I have never used the tube of hardener that comes with bondo, I use the thin hardener that came with the resin. My pieces can hold up to field grade airsoft guns; I'm doing something right.

But aside from that, having completed two pep weapons, I would say that finishing a weapon by sloshing rondo around inside it is destined to fail. In order for it to by thin enough to slosh correctly, you're gonna end up using almost straight resin. And even if you do get the piece hardened using this method, it's gonna be very brittle and easily crushed. You'd be better off cutting the model in half lengthwise and finishing it properly using fiberglass mat (good luck getting it to line up again, though), or use the expanding foam method like I did.
 
Yeah, I've actually thought it over some more and came to the exact same conclusion. I'm going to use smoothcast 320. Its a two part liquid that will harden into plastic. Its slightly thicker than water so will slosh around very nicely. I've done it before with another enclosed pep and its actually very easy and gives FANTASTIC results.
 

noble 1

Member
wow i almost forgot i started this thread, guess i have been busy with the armor instead of the weapons. anyway i used the expanding foam method and it work like a dream. i will post some pics here and in the my spike grenade wip thread if my sister ever lets me use her camera again(dropped it in the pool last time).
 

max

New Member
Awesome noble 1. Could you please also include what brand/type of expanding foam you used, I would greatly appreciate that!
 
The issue for me with the expanding foam method is that I need to put pieces of steel againt one side of my weapon in order for my method of using magnets to have the effect of having the weapons to stick to my armor like in game...

Does anyone have problem solving ideas???
 

LordRahl

New Member
So, is Rondo literally just a mix of fibreglass resin and bondo? I've seen rondo used alot on forums on the 405th, but never was able to figure out what exactly it was. I have an idea combining both this AND the Great Stuff. I used Great Stuff to fill an Elite head, but the problem I ran into was it expanding too much, in a couple spots splitting the seam. So, would it work to slosh around the rondo, then fill it with Great Stuff (or other expanding foam)? I think I'll try this on a weapon if I get the chance anytime soon...
 

surgewhip

New Member
The issue for me with the expanding foam method is that I need to put pieces of steel againt one side of my weapon in order for my method of using magnets to have the effect of having the weapons to stick to my armor like in game...

Does anyone have problem solving ideas???

I think your on the right track with the magnet/metal/expanding foam idea. That is what I'm doing too. I've found the combination of metal strips and low expantion window foam is a great way to give the weapons stability and structure. I'm early in my armor build, so I have not tested the magnetic hold with the pistol to the thigh piece. For the M6 pistol, I also applied a layer of bondo, to fill out any deformities. What I'm wondering though, how will this layer of bondo affect the magnetic hold of the weapon? I plan to apply bondo to the armor pieces as well as to the weapons. Any news or advice from your weapons builds?
 
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