Armor curves, how?


mrwhite

New Member
As the title says it I'm not sure where the curves should start when making foam armor pieces like a pauldron, chest armor or even a helmet

This is my example

Screenshot_3.png
 

Electraknite

Active Member
how good are you at visualizing a pattern for stuff like that? i make basic patterns just with paper and masking tape. 2 crescent shapes will achieve that and then finish it with some heat forming. you could check out how sewing patterns are made, they can be helpful sometimes.
If you want premade patterns I know Kamui cosplay has a bunch of basic shapes and armor patterns available on their website.

is that a fire nation pauldron?
 

mrwhite

New Member
how good are you at visualizing a pattern for stuff like that? i make basic patterns just with paper and masking tape. 2 crescent shapes will achieve that and then finish it with some heat forming. you could check out how sewing patterns are made, they can be helpful sometimes.
If you want premade patterns I know Kamui cosplay has a bunch of basic shapes and armor patterns available on their website.

is that a fire nation pauldron?
The pualdron is from a model of the anime Record of Lodoss War. I just took the model into blender before tracing it using Inkscape.
I know that Kamuy have her own armor foam pieces but just wondered in general how it would be achieved.

Always nice seeing a piece of armor on a concept art but not knowing how to build it
Seems I'll just pattern a flat piece and experiment with the curves until I do it right ( ´・ω・)
 

booyaalex

Member
Always nice seeing a piece of armor on a concept art but not knowing how to build it
Seems I'll just pattern a flat piece and experiment with the curves until I do it right ( ´・ω・)

That's sometimes the best way. I remember making some complex shoulder pieces for other cosplays and the only way I figured out the curves was to play with some cardstock and masking tape.

I've only ever used Blender to adjust scales and slice models, but I'm sure experimenting on a flat piece can't be too hard in it
 

mrwhite

New Member
That's sometimes the best way. I remember making some complex shoulder pieces for other cosplays and the only way I figured out the curves was to play with some cardstock and masking tape.

I've only ever used Blender to adjust scales and slice models, but I'm sure experimenting on a flat piece can't be too hard in it
True True. And here I thought there's some secret society method I never heard of :ninja:
 

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