Buzz Lightyear - 2016 Halloween Costume

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
I was supposed to wear Dark Helmet for 2016's Halloween costume, but unfortunately, only adults would know it and laugh. Kids don't get it. I was always batting around the idea of doing a Buzz Lightyear costume. I had planned for about half a month and worked a lot with Blender to get to the end product.
The planning:
My first step with any armor is I need to have a model of myself or someone basically my size to start. I found a file to start with and then re-sized him to my measurements(i.e. height, arm size, leg size, etc.). As a base line to test the accuracy, I exported the files from Pepakura that I used for Halo Armor and matched it up to my 3d scan to determine the accuracy.
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Moving on, I need Buzz Lightyear. I found this file by a very talented designer.
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I started placing pieces of armor onto my 3d body scan. Buzz Lightyear does not fit a normal human's body type. Some modifications were made:
3d%20Armor.jpg
Since these pieces of armor are way bigger than my print bed, I needed to cut up each item to smaller pieces. The chest alone was about 33 pieces:
Buzz%20Chest%201.gif
Each spool of 1.75mm filament can print roughly 400,000mm safely. Overall, with 64 pieces to print, I needed to make a schedule so I could better plan out the print by spool. This printer was going day and night starting on August 22nd and ending on September 12th with very little brakes in-between. I am so happy with this printer. 10 Spools later and I had a bin of pieces to assemble.
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Time to assemble.
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Since it's ABS plastic, I used an ABS glue that has acetone in it. This stuff works great. I had tested several glues and I found that this was the best for my application. I also used an acetone abs slurry mixture to fill the gaps on some spots. For large gaps and transitions, I used ready patch. A little bit stronger than drywall patch and just as easy to work with.
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I also didn't want my phone on my side so I decided to incorporate it into the suit forearm:
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The forearm is split and held together with elastic and tabs so that the phone can slide in with ease.
The shoes had to be constructed using wood, foam mats, 3D prints, and an old pair of sneakers.
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Sorry for blurry picture
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A lot of painting:
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Print out a set of stickers onto a sticker sheet and laminate the top layer of each sticker with Avery self adhesive laminate sheets. Cut and apply.
The dome was probably the hardest part of the outfit. I started with an acrylic dome:
Acrylic%20dome.jpg

Cut it with a dremel, and dressed up the exposed parts with Boka Car Door Edge Guards. I needed a strip of metal to better support the open and close function of the dome. The Dome is riveted to the metel and the metel is screwed into the suit.
I also added a laser in my right forearm that turns on with a push of a button.
All things assembled and here are the final results.
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The phone in my forearm is connected to the speaker attached to my waist and it'll be playing "You've got a friend in me". I also got some soundbites of Buzz from Toy Story that I uploaded to the phone to play through the speaker at a push of a button as well. I think the kids are really going to get a kick out of this. Thanks for looking.

P.S. I had an extremely positive experience 3D printing a suit of armor. I will always do this again.

Body%20Scan.jpg


High%20Def%20Buzz.jpg


3d%20Armor.jpg


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Acrylic%20dome.jpg


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Jme

Well-Known Member
Wow!

Fantastic work.


"I don't know what is weirder - that you're fighting a stuffed animal, or that you seem to be losing." - Suzie
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
:eek WOW... I'm with JME... that is impressive... what is the brand of 3D printer that you used?
I use a Makergear M2. It is my first 3D Printer and I wanted something that would last me. After this project, and the fact that it was printing basically non-stop for close to a month, I would recommend it to anyone. It took me a bit of learning to get started but I found the resources available for it very helpful. I created an enclosure setup for it in my basement so that I can print during the cold winter months.
 

FirstPick

Member
I've always wanted to make a Buzz suit. Maybe mash it with a Halo armor.

Sent from my HTC6525LVW using Tapatalk
 

Dirtdives

Division Scheduler and Keeper of Con Lists
Division Staff
Community Staff
What? No pop-up wings? ...just joking.......FANTASTIC costume..........It's not just the build....it's the paint job as well. Nicely done. Very toy looking......you should put a black swirl on your chin to complete the Buzz face.
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
What? No pop-up wings?
Thanks Dirtdives. Actually, I was thinking about pop up wings in the beginning based on this example, but the time crunch of starting late August and the practicality of walking around with wings made me lean against it. One quick turn and I probably would take out half a dozen kids.
 

Dirtdives

Division Scheduler and Keeper of Con Lists
Division Staff
Community Staff
Well the downed kids not withstanding, the suit looks crazy insane. How much filament did you go through to complete?
 

KIsmay

New Member
Great job! That turned out excellent! I like how you incorporated the phone holder into your forearm, that's ingenious!
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
Well the downed kids not withstanding, the suit looks crazy insane. How much filament did you go through to complete?
I went through a little over 9 and a half spools of white ABS plastic. Each spool has a little more than roughly 400,000mm of filament. Each print tells how much filament is needed before you send it to the printer. All I had to do was match up the prints to get me close to 400,000mm and the switch the spools after I got close. The organizer inside me made a schedule.

Great job! That turned out excellent! I like how you incorporated the phone holder into your forearm, that's ingenious!
Thanks Klsmay. I'm happy you liked it and that I could share it with you all here on the boards.


Here are some pictures from the Trunk or treat. What a great time.

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