Dash's 3d print thread

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
Haha this is why I have stuck to PLA. It’s much more forgiving than PETG.
Glad to see you got it corrected though. That’s a really clean print.
I was going to do pla but decided it wasnt for me at the moment. I still didn't correct anything and it definatly isnt as good as it should be, but I will hopefully get there sometime soon :)
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
Well... that's the problem. I havent dialed it in, and I havent changed anything since my first working prints for the most part... it just started printing cleaner. I am still getting leaks and problems on the edge, but it is nowhere near as much as it was, and I will take it!
Who is the make of the petG?
 

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
Well this sucks. I am currently four hours through my cleanest print ever, but I didnt realize how much fillament was left. I burned through the whole spool, and I now have only a foot left of fillament. The print has about eleven hours left to print. With the hurricane coming too, I have to evacuate tommorow morning. I dont have another spool of petg to feed through, and if i were to pause it till after the hurricane, i would loose my progress because a power outage is innevitable... D:

What is awesome though is I only have to print three more peices of the dmr, plus the magazine and scope(plus the peice that I dont have enough fillamentleft to finish). It is looking amazing and i already started gluingsome peices together with JB quick weld. Holding up good, but some peices lifted off of the print bed leaving some good gaps. I will do what alpha did with his 3d prints and use superglue and baby powder to fill in the seams.

This thing is huge and may as well just be a sniper rifle. It is around four feet long. 1:1 scale
15673656936096683179448611277003.jpg
 

Sean Anwalt

RCO
405th Regiment Officer
Not sure how to react to that post... "almost done with the dmr... have to evacuate..." hmmm

Good luck man, and be safe. You can always redo the dmr, can't always go back and evacuate.
 

Wayward Flood

Member
Well this sucks. I am currently four hours through my cleanest print ever, but I didnt realize how much fillament was left. I burned through the whole spool, and I now have only a foot left of fillament. The print has about eleven hours left to print. With the hurricane coming too, I have to evacuate tommorow morning. I dont have another spool of petg to feed through, and if i were to pause it till after the hurricane, i would loose my progress because a power outage is innevitable... D:

What is awesome though is I only have to print three more peices of the dmr, plus the magazine and scope(plus the peice that I dont have enough fillamentleft to finish). It is looking amazing and i already started gluingsome peices together with JB quick weld. Holding up good, but some peices lifted off of the print bed leaving some good gaps. I will do what alpha did with his 3d prints and use superglue and baby powder to fill in the seams.

This thing is huge and may as well just be a sniper rifle. It is around four feet long. 1:1 scaleView attachment 277230
Aren't bull pups fun!! I just guestimated the area were my power outage left off and started it at that point in Cura. Loctite fixes all woes.
 

Chooka

Member
What percent infil are you using? I mean I go through a lot of filament, but it sounds like your are using a lot for a DMR.

Lookin good though!
 

Chooka

Member
I'll check when I get a chance, but I think it is %8
Oh that’s fine. With a few walls it should be able to withstand normal use. I typically use 10% for most things, and rarely go up or over 15%. Really it’s only if the item needs more rigidity or strength.
 

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
Update. I started using j.b. quick weld on my parts while I wait for more fillament to arrive. Even though we luckily didnt get hit by the hurricane, almost at all, Amazon wont deliver till Monday. Also pray for the Bahamas. They ended up getting it real bad.

15677215548505317627373894566219.jpg

I dont know if you can see it because my camera is bad, but this really shows off the warping. I have most of the gun assembled in three big peices, but I dont want to move any further yet. The right side of this peice is flush and glued perfectly. The left and middle you can see where the peice curled off of the heat bed, leaving a gap because the edges arent flush. I can almost fit a penny in the gap of the far left seam, and I feel like only a small part of the adhesive is holding it together. It is still strong, but I am worried if put under any more stress it will break since there isnt alot holding it together(because it cant grab the other peice the gap is so big).

I also tried doing what alpha did and mix baby powder and superglue, but since I dont have something silicone to mix it on, it instantly cures instead of making a putty. I may just end up using bondo on it all to hopefully find in the seams and strengthen it. I dont want to reprint though, but I will if i have to. I also had two peices break off, but it was because the adhesive failed and tore off the plastic. I then realized I forgot to sand it down to give the weld something to hold onto...

Oh well. I'll see what I can do
 

Frozensnot

Well-Known Member
I also tried doing what alpha did and mix baby powder and superglue, but since I dont have something silicone to mix it on, it instantly cures instead of making a putty. I may just end up using bondo on it all to hopefully find in the seams and strengthen it.
I tried applying the same principle in regards to filling in my seams but did it a little differently. I don't know if this is a correct way of doing it but I put my super glue into the seam and threw on some baking soda to instantly solidify it. If I needed to fill the seam more, I just put more super glue and baking soda in the seam.

Your prints came out pretty smooth! It's looking good!
 

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
I tried applying the same principle in regards to filling in my seams but did it a little differently. I don't know if this is a correct way of doing it but I put my super glue into the seam and threw on some baking soda to instantly solidify it. If I needed to fill the seam more, I just put more super glue and baking soda in the seam.

Your prints came out pretty smooth! It's looking good!
Most of these cam out good, but was all spaghetti on the outside. I just removed everything with teasers and it looked fine. I tried doing that method, but the problem is that there is so much unfilled space that when I fill up the void, when I add the superglue it doesnt get down in there. It only hits the edge and cures that rock hard
 

Chooka

Member
You can also try using some dowels for strength. Drill out a few holes and drop in some dowels, should really pump up the joint/strength
 

ajmadison

New Member
I tried applying the same principle in regards to filling in my seams but did it a little differently. I don't know if this is a correct way of doing it but I put my super glue into the seam and threw on some baking soda to instantly solidify it. If I needed to fill the seam more, I just put more super glue and baking soda in the seam.

Your prints came out pretty smooth! It's looking good!
I almost have a visceral reaction when I hear about someone using baking soda as a filler/accelerant for super glue. Baking soda reacts to high humidity. If you and your projects will forever be in Nevada (wink) then this is probably not a problem. The issue is that superglue looks solid, but is actually porous. And eventually, the baking soda will absorb enough moisture, and it will become a bubbling goo that will ooze out of the superglue filler. If you need a cheap bulking agent, try pure talcum powder (none of that extra scented stuff, or corn starch). Frankly, I either use just more superglue and accelerant, or if the seam is very large, I stuff scrap bits of the same material being glued together into the seam, ie. styrene for injected kits, PLA rafts and supports for 3D prints.
 
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