Dexter Grif Project, My 2nd build

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Alrighty, here goes nothing.

Some of you may know me from the New Recruits forum. Over about a year and a half I attempted to make my first Halo costume out of foam. I think I went through 2 different threads just because my different attempts varied so much in terms of skill level. It's actually kind of crazy looking back at my first few attempts and comparing them to the most recent.

Eventually, about 4 months ago, I finished my custom Halo medic costume. I'm still super proud of it and have worn it around town to a few events but haven't had the opportunity to take it out to an actual con yet and give it a test run. I did however get noticed by 343 on Waypoint and manage to get my deployment application approved by my regiment. So I've got that going for me, which makes me feel great!

Here's a link to my 1st(or 3rd if you count the ones I abandoned before they finished): Restarting my Freelancer Medic


BUUUUTTTTT that hasn't stopped the cosplay and perfectionist bugs in me from coming up with all sorts of ideas and pushing me to continue to improve.

So here we go.

Every year my wife and I set aside a certain amount of cash from our tax returns just for the two of us. Usually the rest goes to house improvements and things for the kids. This year I decided to use the bulk of mine on a nice little 3d printer! Over the last few months of finishing my medic costume I experimented with the printer and learned how to model/slice/scale objects. It took me a while to move up from simple small objects but Recently I decided to try and 3D print a new suit!

I decided to stick with the RvBverse, but this time go with someone more recognizeable instead of an OC. Thus, Project Grif was born!

I messed up the scaling on my first attempt. And by the time I realized it I'd gone through almost an entire spool of filament. :[ But you live and your learn.

My goal with this helmet to keep all the proportions to scale, one of my weak points with my last build, and to provide my self enough room for a few things: LEDS for lights on the side of the helmet, cooling fans in front and back, and rare earth magnets.

After converted the pep file and scaling it/thickening it/preparing it for 3d print, I sliced the helmet into 4 easy to manage sections. That way I wasn't worrying about slicing up 200 small areas all at once. Then I could take my time with each of the 4 areas and focus on making sure smaller sections were perfected at a time. It's a lot less overwhelming when I set small goals like that and a lot easier to manage wen I get home and can remember where the current slice is supposed to go.

Another goal with this helmet being more proportionate is to give myself an easy way to get in and out of the helmet. With my foam helmet it was easy. I'd read that you should make it a few inches bigger to allow for padding and lights/fans but I've learned that about half an inch should do. So I've lined up the back slices on all 4 sections of the helmet to create essentially two solid pieces for this helmet, the front 3/4ths and the back 1/4th. I'm going to attach rare earth magnets on the insides of each piece to hold them together while I walk around while at the same time allowing myself an easy way to remove the helmet should I get hot or want to eat. It was simple with the foam helmet because of the size but with this one being closer to my actual head size I think this will be pretty simple and effective. I might add a bit of velcro in if the magnets need a little extra help but I doubt they will. I used them to on my pistol for my last costume to attach it to my thigh.

Okay, that's enough ranting about what I've done for today. So far I have the bottom two sections built and have started to print the top sections off. Hopefully by the end of the week I'll be ready to add some auto body filler and resin to toughen this thing up and get ready for painting.



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Medic costume. Might have to pack her up if this project goes well.


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Front view. I wish I'd thought about it ahead of time, but I'm going to go in later and use my drill or my dremel to cut out the light holes on the sides. Then I'll add LED's through the holes. Just on the the inside of the print I built a little shelf for a battery to sit on.

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Side view. you can see a few gaps but nothing to major. I already have to go over it with autobody filler to cover up the areas where the pieces line up so it shouldn't be too major of a fix.

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Here you can see where I've left the back area detached to allow for easy access on and off.

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Trying her on. Much better fit to my head. Ignore my messy hair, it's the weekend man.

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Added some tape to the sides to hold the piece together while I try it on. Looks like it'll fit snug but still leave me just enough room for all the electronics I want to put in.
 

RickHunter

New Member
Interesting choice with the many small parts approach. I personally like slicing the piece up so that each part fits a good portion of the printer's build volume. Also wanted to ask, maybe its the angle in some of the photos but are you having any gaps in the layers of the parts? I've had that with some prints before and it made it very easy for them to snap in half so just wanted to ask if you're making sure the layer adhesion is good. Lastly, are you going to be friction welding the helmet together with spare filament or just using glue/epoxy?

Edit: Doh, ended up spending so much time thinking about my questions I forgot to say that its looking good so far :p
 

TurboCharizard

Division PR, RMO and BCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Interesting choice with the many small parts approach. I personally like slicing the piece up so that each part fits a good portion of the printer's build volume. Also wanted to ask, maybe its the angle in some of the photos but are you having any gaps in the layers of the parts? I've had that with some prints before and it made it very easy for them to snap in half so just wanted to ask if you're making sure the layer adhesion is good. Lastly, are you going to be friction welding the helmet together with spare filament or just using glue/epoxy?
Edit: Doh, ended up spending so much time thinking about my questions I forgot to say that its looking good so far :p

Agreed on the layer separation on some parts, especially around the cheek plate on the left side of the face. Luckily there won't be too much stress in that section so some body filler jammed into the gap should be able to keep anything from snapping.

JD of Asgard what are your print settings like? There might be a fairly easy adjustment to reduce errors like that in prints.
 

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Interesting choice with the many small parts approach. I personally like slicing the piece up so that each part fits a good portion of the printer's build volume. Also wanted to ask, maybe its the angle in some of the photos but are you having any gaps in the layers of the parts? I've had that with some prints before and it made it very easy for them to snap in half so just wanted to ask if you're making sure the layer adhesion is good. Lastly, are you going to be friction welding the helmet together with spare filament or just using glue/epoxy?

Edit: Doh, ended up spending so much time thinking about my questions I forgot to say that its looking good so far :p

I've tried that but my printer seems to have problems the bigger the print size. Not sure what it is that does it, but I've made my peice with it.
There are some gaps yeah. This is the biggest 3d print project I've ever done and the first time I've really needed to worry about slicing objects so I'm learning as I go. I watched some tutorials though and I think since these gaps aren't too big that I might be able to fill them with wood filler or auto body filler.

Thanks for that! :D


Agreed on the layer separation on some parts, especially around the cheek plate on the left side of the face. Luckily there won't be too much stress in that section so some body filler jammed into the gap should be able to keep anything from snapping.

JD of Asgard what are your print settings like? There might be a fairly easy adjustment to reduce errors like that in prints.
Yes! I watched a few tutorials on youtube about using body filler to fix the little gaps and strengthen it. I haven't seen anything about using this, but I know it works with foam helmets, I think using resin and fiberglass on the inside might help as well? I don't know, I'll have to do more research before I commit to that.

I'm not exactly sure what my settings are at. I'm pretty new to the whole 3d printing world and have only done a few small prints before. Maybe it's the way I'm slicing it that's causing the gaps? It's never every piece that has them so I'm not completely sure that that's the reason.
 

RickHunter

New Member
JD of Asgard What brand and model 3D Printer do you have? Usually alot of issues with print quality can be fixed with some easily made modifications or loading a set of preset settings for the slicer from around the net where someone has already done the tweaking of settings for your specific printer to get better prints out of it. I can try to walk you through tweaking a few things to get better quality out of your prints if you'd like.
 

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
JD of Asgard What brand and model 3D Printer do you have? Usually alot of issues with print quality can be fixed with some easily made modifications or loading a set of preset settings for the slicer from around the net where someone has already done the tweaking of settings for your specific printer to get better prints out of it. I can try to walk you through tweaking a few things to get better quality out of your prints if you'd like.

XYZprinting Da Vinci Jr 1.0
 

RickHunter

New Member
XYZprinting Da Vinci Jr 1.0
Ah, makes a little more sense now since its a plug and play printer. Dont get me wrong theres nothing wrong with those printers I just dont have alot of experience with them since alot of the ones I've seen make it harder to make upgrades and modifications to them. You're using filament from XYZ on a custom spool designed for the Da Vinci Jr and using their slicing software XYZWare correct?

Edit: Based on the information I can find on the Da Vinci Jr 1.0 I would play a little in the settings menu in XYZWare(if thats the program you're using to slice) and see if you can slow down the printing speed a little and make sure the bed is leveled properly. It could be that your printer is running its nozzle around the layers fast enough that its not getting a good melting contact with the precious layer which is causing those gaps. That and leveling the print bed is never a bad thing, it can only cause things to get better :) Sometimes I'll level the print bed 3 times before a print and find that adjustments from the previous level will throw it off so its always good to double check things like that.
 
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JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Ah, makes a little more sense now since its a plug and play printer. Dont get me wrong theres nothing wrong with those printers I just dont have alot of experience with them since alot of the ones I've seen make it harder to make upgrades and modifications to them. You're using filament from XYZ on a custom spool designed for the Da Vinci Jr and using their slicing software XYZWare correct?

Edit: Based on the information I can find on the Da Vinci Jr 1.0 I would play a little in the settings menu in XYZWare(if thats the program you're using to slice) and see if you can slow down the printing speed a little and make sure the bed is leveled properly. It could be that your printer is running its nozzle around the layers fast enough that its not getting a good melting contact with the precious layer which is causing those gaps. That and leveling the print bed is never a bad thing, it can only cause things to get better :) Sometimes I'll level the print bed 3 times before a print and find that adjustments from the previous level will throw it off so its always good to double check things like that.

Thanks for the advice! I've found the settings for slowing down the prints but I haven't played with the them yet. It's set at the default speed right now but I'll slow the next few prints down and see if that makes a difference.

I've heard about messing around with the settings and doing upgrades/mods but I haven't really messed around with it just yet. I think I just might after some more research though
 

HaloHunterChief

Jr Member
great job so far bro I have only seen a 3d printer once in my life but I'm really happy for u cause 3d printing is a lot easier than peping or making it out of foam
Just a side note I really like that medic costume u made it looks awesome great build
 

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
great job so far bro I have only seen a 3d printer once in my life but I'm really happy for u cause 3d printing is a lot easier than peping or making it out of foam
Just a side note I really like that medic costume u made it looks awesome great build


thank you! Yeah I ordered a pretty cheap one from amazon, cost about 300. Like other's have said, it's a pretty simple plug and play type printer so there's not a whole lot of set up needed but I definitely needed to youtube the hell out of some tutorials before I hoped to start with this project.

I love the hell out of that medic costume. :] You're right though, it took forever working out all of that foam. lol
 

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Continued printing over the last few days. I've yourtube'd a bunch about updating my printer setting and upgrades I can do on my own. I'm so far into this print, about 75% so far, that I'm just going to power through and fill the gaps with auto body filler. They're not anything too substantial and they're not throwing off the symmetry of the helmet so I think I'll be fine there.

BUT I am going to be performing those updates/upgrades before moving on to the other prints. It'll save me time in the long run.

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RickHunter

New Member
JD of Asgard It looks like you're using superglue to put all the pieces together. Do you have a Dremel or rotary tool? You can put some spare filament into the rotary chuck (use small pieces like maybe an inch or two long and make them straight) and weld the pieces together by melting the extra plastic between the two pieces through the friction of the filament rubbing against them (yay friction welding :D ). It can fill small gaps and creates a strong bond, I would recommend giving it a try on your helmet if you feel up to it :)

3D Printing Nerd has a tutorial of sorts on how to do it, its how I've merged most of my prints so far. Just take a black squeeze clip like people use to hold glass printer beds down to hold your two parts together while you start the weld so its easier to keep things lined up then holding bother pieces together while you weld. Once you've got a few beads of plastic holding things together you can remove the clips and weld the whole join area creating a very strong bond.

Oh, and here's that tutorial:
 

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
JD of Asgard It looks like you're using superglue to put all the pieces together. Do you have a Dremel or rotary tool? You can put some spare filament into the rotary chuck (use small pieces like maybe an inch or two long and make them straight) and weld the pieces together by melting the extra plastic between the two pieces through the friction of the filament rubbing against them (yay friction welding :D ). It can fill small gaps and creates a strong bond, I would recommend giving it a try on your helmet if you feel up to it :)

3D Printing Nerd has a tutorial of sorts on how to do it, its how I've merged most of my prints so far. Just take a black squeeze clip like people use to hold glass printer beds down to hold your two parts together while you start the weld so its easier to keep things lined up then holding bother pieces together while you weld. Once you've got a few beads of plastic holding things together you can remove the clips and weld the whole join area creating a very strong bond.

Oh, and here's that tutorial:
hell yeah! thank you! I do have a rotary tool but I didn't know I could use it for this. Thank you for the tutorial. I'll have to try it out on something a little smaller scale first but it'll definitely come in handy.
 

JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Got everything put together finally. I've been filling a lot of those little gaps with wood filler. Some of the gaps were relatively big towards the end. I'm definitely going to have to work on some of those printer settings before I continue on with the project. Take a look a the printer bed or maybe slow the prints down even further.

I still have a lot of sanding to go on it but it's looking better and better!

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JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Update!

After a whole bunch of sanding, I gave the helmet a quick coat of filler primer. After that I went over some problem areas with spot putty(and I went a little overboard with it). Tomorrow I'm going to sand a bit more and go over it with another coat of filler primer.

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JD of Asgard

Active Member
Member DIN
S757
Painted and weathered! Thinking about adding a few metallic scuff marks but I don't want to over do it.

Just waiting for the weather around here to improve before I fiberglass the insides.

And just my luck that my extruder went down so now I'm stuck on progress with about half a forearm printed.
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