Epoxy Question

ConnorCreator

New Member
I've got most of my paper build finished and I'm looking to harden, I saw that "epoxy resin" works well. I bought this epoxy at the hardware store and when I applied it to the shoulder it made it a bit tougher after two coats but its a bit floppy, it's turning it into kind of a rubber instead of plastic, is this not the right type? I don't think I can sand this slightly sticky surface, do I bondo over it? fiberglass the inside? Thanks for the help.
 

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xXDashIVXx

Sr Member
I have never heard of using a 5 minute epoxy, but the usual method is using resin. You may have mistaken epoxy resin for this? You can probably save the price if you fiberglass the inside, as resin or epoxy alone will only make the cardstock firm. The fiberglass is what gives it strength. Then afterwards sand down the edges and add bondo in thin concentrated areas to define the shape
 

ConnorCreator

New Member
I have never heard of using a 5 minute epoxy, but the usual method is using resin. You may have mistaken epoxy resin for this? You can probably save the price if you fiberglass the inside, as resin or epoxy alone will only make the cardstock firm. The fiberglass is what gives it strength. Then afterwards sand down the edges and add bondo in thin concentrated areas to define the shape
Awesome thank you
 

Grayewulfe

New Member
Most people in the USA use car fiberglass resin as the epoxy resin to harden the paper. Thin thin coats to get it to stiffen some, then. Full fiberglass on the inside.
So I saw cerealkill3r's tutorial on YouTube. He said to use epoxy resin because it's easier. But I also saw people saying that you need to rondo afterwards. But I'm not sure I understand that whole process at all and couldnt find a definitive guide
 

Ashuraa

Judicial Officer
Division Staff
Rondo is a 1:1 ratio, or there about, of fiberglass resin, and Bondo body filler. That is where the name Rondo comes from
Resin Bondo.

The way you mix this is you take the main Bondo element, the part in the can, mix about the same amount by volume of the Resin, without the hardener added yet. Get it smooth and we'll mixed. It will make the Bondo thinner, and more like a thick paint compared to a putty like it normally is.

Then you add the hardener agent. Mix it in well. Then paint or spatula on the mixture to where you want it.
 

Grayewulfe

New Member
Rondo is a 1:1 ratio, or there about, of fiberglass resin, and Bondo body filler. That is where the name Rondo comes from
Resin Bondo.

The way you mix this is you take the main Bondo element, the part in the can, mix about the same amount by volume of the Resin, without the hardener added yet. Get it smooth and we'll mixed. It will make the Bondo thinner, and more like a thick paint compared to a putty like it normally is.

Then you add the hardener agent. Mix it in well. Then paint or spatula on the mixture to where you want it.
So if we were to use a non toxic epoxy resin like smooth-on or aqua free resin because of the non toxic chemicals, would you still fiber glass the inside and then rondo the outside?
 

Asgardianhammer

Identity Officer & RCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
So to be clear folks there are two types of Resin for Fiberglass. Polyester Resin which is the Bondo Brand many of us have used because we can get the Bondo brand at Wal-Mart or other hardware stores. The other type is in fact epoxy resin and is commonly used in marine applications. West Systems makes a lot of fiberglass epoxy resin materials. Epoxy resin for fiberglass is no the same type however found in two-part adhesives. These two things are not synonymous.
 

Asgardianhammer

Identity Officer & RCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
So if we were to use a non-toxic epoxy resin like smooth-on or aqua free resin because of the non-toxic chemicals, would you still fiberglass the inside and then rondo the outside?
I am not sure a non-toxic epoxy resin exists. Aqua resin does exist and is still pretty aggressive. I would still add glass mat or glass chop cloth to the inside of your parts as this is what gives the pieces reinforcement. The strands absorb the resin making a tough shell. Without this your parts are susceptible to warp and would require way more coats of resin than necessary. If you "Rondo" any portion I would do the interior of the part, not exterior. You should rasp the geometry on your parts after hard coated (two thin coats on the exterior, hard coat, and fiberglass the inside) to remove any facets in the pepakura. Then apply straight "Bondo" and work in patches. Don't try to Bondo the entire thing at once. Don't substitute Rondo for Bondo on the exterior as this will be far too thin and runny to control.

Towards the bottom of this gallery are some of my progress pics for your review.
Asgardianhammer - Professional, General Artist | DeviantArt
 

Grayewulfe

New Member
So to be clear folks there are two types of Resin for Fiberglass. Polyester Resin which is the Bondo Brand many of us have used because we can get the Bondo brand at Wal-Mart or other hardware stores. The other type is in fact epoxy resin and is commonly used in marine applications. West Systems makes a lot of fiberglass epoxy resin materials. Epoxy resin for fiberglass is no the same type however found in two-part adhesives. These two things are not synonymous.
I guess I worded it wrong and I'm not following, so If I were to use Epoxy resin, would I still fiberglass the inside, or is the epoxy enough
 

Asgardianhammer

Identity Officer & RCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Yes you would still fiberglass the inside. Fiberglass is a term used to describe the fill material you add to the resin. I also would use polyester resin for someone just starting. You can buy a gallon can for around 40.00 bucks at walmart or hardware store. Also invest in a respirator. You will be dealing with strands of glass that can seriously damage your lungs. That stuff is super airborne.
 
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