First Armor: Which to make?

ACEz

New Member
Hi everyone, I am new here so not sure if this is the right place to post this.
I got a 3D printer a few months back and have been testing it out here and there with various prints but I think it is time to go big. I want to make a full suit of either spartan armor from Reach (Emile or Carter) or an ODST from Halo 3: ODST (Buck or Rookie). I have the 3-D files but am unsure which to pick as this is my first attempt at something like this. I am not sure which if any of these would be easiest as well as how mobility works with everything being 3D printed and rigid. Also need to look up the differences between Buck and Rookie's armor in ODST to make sure I have the right files. Any and al help is greatly appreciated.
 

he4thbar

Well-Known Member
Buck and rookie are pretty much the same armor, except buck has the radio comm on his helmet and rookie has ammo pouches on his chest piece.
Either way a full 3d printed build is gonna be heavy and clunky, but it is definitly possible. TurboCharizard made a spartan 2 completely out of 3d print and Rock Lobbster is making a jorge from halo reach out of all 3d print.
 

TurboCharizard

Division PR, RMO and BCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
A fully printed Mk VI and a hybrid Mk V suit have gone through my printers and the most important lesson learned is that you need to consider pinch points and how muscles move when you do. Thigh plates are an interesting part in general because when sitting down, walking or kneeling muscles flex and solid thighs can be uncomfortable so replacing the inner gasket with a flexible material is a good thing to consider.
20190616_115839.jpg
 

Rock Lobbster

Member
Printed armor is a bit on the hefty side and you want to practice scaling pieces beforehand. Having a miscaled part can be an expensive mistake!
I'm a fan of foam armor for being dumb at cons and doing weird poses/being a dork.
Printed armor is neat for looking nice and you can do other things while your armor prints.
 

ACEz

New Member
A fully printed Mk VI and a hybrid Mk V suit have gone through my printers and the most important lesson learned is that you need to consider pinch points and how muscles move when you do. Thigh plates are an interesting part in general because when sitting down, walking or kneeling muscles flex and solid thighs can be uncomfortable so replacing the inner gasket with a flexible material is a good thing to consider.
View attachment 296080
Thanks for the help. I will keep that in mind. might scale the pieces up a tiny bit to make room on the inside for movement.
 

ACEz

New Member
Printed armor is a bit on the hefty side and you want to practice scaling pieces beforehand. Having a miscaled part can be an expensive mistake!
I'm a fan of foam armor for being dumb at cons and doing weird poses/being a dork.
Printed armor is neat for looking nice and you can do other things while your armor prints.
I have the pieces scaled to my body VIA software on my computer, the issue I am still trying to tackle is mobility/ durability.
 

Rock Lobbster

Member
I have the pieces scaled to my body VIA software on my computer, the issue I am still trying to tackle is mobility/ durability.
Foam armor is easier to move in and if the part isn't quite scaled its easier to fix/change. 3d printed armor can be a lot more durable (depending on your material and printer settings).
 
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