foam/3d printed halo reach carter build

JP120800

New Member
Hey there!

Im looking at building the armour that carter wears and wondered if you guys know any templates i could use when i cut the individual parts out of foam. i am currently 3D printing the helmet so thats covered.

Anything you can share about how to build armour/tips would be greatly appreciated!

Joe
 
I still haven't looked for the exact files you PM'd me about, but I did find a few resources that you may be able to use.

Fallen has a thread with some useful links, although I don't think the build was ever finished:

Also, the first bit of this really old build thread might give you some leads as well:
 
N8TEBB linked my old thread from a currently paused Carter build. I was using files from the armory for the few foam parts I'd completed before putting the project on indefinite pause. There's also links in there to any build threads I was referencing at the time.

The core will be these Armory files with changes to shoulders, chest attachment, Tacpad forearm attachment, and knees.

If you want a bit more of a step by step for some sections such as gauntlet, bicep, and thighs. RandomRanger had worked on a tutorial series on Youtube a couple of years ago of the core parts you'll need. Don't know how far along the series was and what all parts are covered, but still worth the watch if you're wanting some video help in how some of the parts go together.
 
N8TEBB linked my old thread from a currently paused Carter build. I was using files from the armory for the few foam parts I'd completed before putting the project on indefinite pause. There's also links in there to any build threads I was referencing at the time.

The core will be these Armory files with changes to shoulders, chest attachment, Tacpad forearm attachment, and knees.

If you want a bit more of a step by step for some sections such as gauntlet, bicep, and thighs. RandomRanger had worked on a tutorial series on Youtube a couple of years ago of the core parts you'll need. Don't know how far along the series was and what all parts are covered, but still worth the watch if you're wanting some video help in how some of the parts go together.
Can i ask how you were getting your templates in order to cut out foam and glue it together? im trying to use Pepakura but it keeps creating too many pages of cut outs for me to follow. maybe because of the CAD file im using.
 
I've found a process that works for me when working w/ foam, but it may be overkill for some or not enough for others. Experiment and figure out what works for you. After scaling I print all of the templates. Forearm for example was probably around 7 or 8 pages for my final scale. Before I ever cut out all of my parts I do a pass while looking at the file in Pepakura Designer and add any notes I think I may need such as bevel directions, towards whatever joint (elbow, wrist, etc.), part gets traced twice and mirrored; you get the idea.

2024-05-30 15.11.30.jpg 2024-05-30 15.12.09.jpg

After cutting I store all parts in zipper bags to keep them together. While tracing onto foam every item gets marked with L or R for Left or Right part (if applicable), bevel directions (if applicable).

You can see in these examples an idea of some of the markings I'll transfer to the foam itself. Couldn't find any photos pre-cutting parts out.
2023-02-19 14.34.42.jpg 2023-02-20 12.32.06.jpg

I tend to keep all cut out parts in a box and create a sort of assembly line of construction when I build. Apply contact cement to each part/edge getting glued, let them dry. Assemble. Always have the part file open in Pepakura Designer on a screen that I can reference while building. Makes it a lot easier to double check you're putting together the right things.

While working on my first Mk VII my workspace basically looked like this using an old projector to throw the model up on the wall for myself.
2023-02-05 14.39.41.jpg
 
I've found a process that works for me when working w/ foam, but it may be overkill for some or not enough for others. Experiment and figure out what works for you. After scaling I print all of the templates. Forearm for example was probably around 7 or 8 pages for my final scale. Before I ever cut out all of my parts I do a pass while looking at the file in Pepakura Designer and add any notes I think I may need such as bevel directions, towards whatever joint (elbow, wrist, etc.), part gets traced twice and mirrored; you get the idea.

View attachment 348674 View attachment 348675

After cutting I store all parts in zipper bags to keep them together. While tracing onto foam every item gets marked with L or R for Left or Right part (if applicable), bevel directions (if applicable).

You can see in these examples an idea of some of the markings I'll transfer to the foam itself. Couldn't find any photos pre-cutting parts out.
View attachment 348676 View attachment 348677

I tend to keep all cut out parts in a box and create a sort of assembly line of construction when I build. Apply contact cement to each part/edge getting glued, let them dry. Assemble. Always have the part file open in Pepakura Designer on a screen that I can reference while building. Makes it a lot easier to double check you're putting together the right things.

While working on my first Mk VII my workspace basically looked like this using an old projector to throw the model up on the wall for myself.
View attachment 348678
this is really helpful, i am going to be able to 3D pring most parts. So i will be building from foam, the thighs and the torsa basically. will post photos of the helmet once built :)
 
UPDATE: Helmet is printed and assembled and reasy for primer and paint
 

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