GRID PATTERN/CARBON FIBER LOOK: TUTORIAL

SlowJam

New Member
I wanted to post this on the creation forum but it wont let me.

Hey guys. Since alot of you guys have questions for me aready, Im doing my best to answer all of them. In the meantime, I wanted to contribute to the forum with this tutorial.

Instead of painting your armor just green or blue or red like everyone else. I ran into an idea. I wanted to do a CARBON FIBER pattern to sepparate me from the rest. Yes, I know the armor is supposed to look metal and undistructable, but hey, we arnt really fighting in war with the armor. haha.

For some costumers and hobbyists, this seems like a challenging task. Well, guess what, If done patiently and carefully, its VERY EASY!

The fallowing link is actually to a tutorial on decorating a VALVE COVER for a car. But the methods and principles in this tutorial can be used on armor. Just differnt paint material and colors need to be changed.

CARBON FIBER-LOOK TUTORIAL

Hope this helps!
 

flying squirl

Well-Known Member
that is an ingenious idea!!!! this would be very nice to have in the worn places. ie: green paint scraped to reveal this. thanks for posting this.
 

AoBfrost

Well-Known Member
Pay 100 dollars, get a huge 12 foot long sheet of vinyl from a graphics shop, then get yourself a heat gun, start cutting and applying.

Alot of people do this to their cars, they dont wanna fork over cash for real carbon fiber, so they just use vinyl. It protects the original piece of the body also, rocks, bugs, all that which could scratch or dent the car.
 

SlowJam

New Member
hey guys. I appreciate you guys taking the time to read this. I would go the vinyl route because its b*tch to deal with. You have to predertmin the cuts and fold into the creases properly. In my opinion, the vinyl method is effective but I like the painting route better.
 
There is another way you could do that by using looser weave fiberglass that could show a badly worn or abused section while leaving other areas smooth.
First, decide how big a section you want the cut the glass and lay it out on some foil, wax paper, or anything the resin won't stick to then coat the glass with the resin making sure it's completly covered, then pick up the coated piece and place it where you want it and use a spreader to feather out the resin and press the glass on to the piece. You can scrape off the resin off areas you want the weave of the glass to show more worn area and leave it thicker on less worn areas. You can also use this idea to re enforce places that that will bet more stress, like the butt and the elbows since you know they will be getting more abuse then other parts of the armor.

btw, coating the glass with resin then laying it on what you're working on is how I learned to do glass work. Gluing dry glass to the object, letting tat dry then gloping resin seems to me to be an unnesessary, time wasting step, resin the glass before you lay it up and you'll save a bit of time and resin since you won't be using as much which in turn saves money since a can will go farther. :)
 

SlowJam

New Member
Jarhead said:
There is another way you could do that by using looser weave fiberglass that could show a badly worn or abused section while leaving other areas smooth.
First, decide how big a section you want the cut the glass and lay it out on some foil, wax paper, or anything the resin won't stick to then coat the glass with the resin making sure it's completly covered, then pick up the coated piece and place it where you want it and use a spreader to feather out the resin and press the glass on to the piece. You can scrape off the resin off areas you want the weave of the glass to show more worn area and leave it thicker on less worn areas. You can also use this idea to re enforce places that that will bet more stress, like the butt and the elbows since you know they will be getting more abuse then other parts of the armor.

btw, coating the glass with resin then laying it on what you're working on is how I learned to do glass work. Gluing dry glass to the object, letting tat dry then gloping resin seems to me to be an unnesessary, time wasting step, resin the glass before you lay it up and you'll save a bit of time and resin since you won't be using as much which in turn saves money since a can will go farther. :)
Great idea! But this method I posted is to AVOID going that route.
 
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