Has anyone tried Rust-oleum FlexiDip as an alternative to Plasti-Dip?

EVAkura

RCO
405th Regiment Officer
I have not seen this brought up before, and just ran across this product at Home Depot today. Even though I am trying to avoid using Plasti-dip, she convinced me to purchase a can so I can post results to y'all.

So, I will try this out tomorrow and let you know how it works in comparison in this thread.

Just so you know, it was $5.98 for an 11oz can.
 

ShockWave

Member
Just curious, how come your trying to avoid plastidip? I know it can be a bit pricey but does it's jobe very well.
 

EVAkura

RCO
405th Regiment Officer
Just curious, how come your trying to avoid plastidip? I know it can be a bit pricey but does it's jobe very well.
Price and its properties are not what I am looking for. It mostly comes down to the PVA base coat for me. Simply a personal preference.

Also, on the first test of this product, I am not too pleased. It runs WAY too easily and goes on way too thin. The part I worked on is drying, so I will check on it tomorrow and give an update then.
 

Bobby Boucher

Active Member
I've used it. Not for armor making, but I painted the bow tie on my Chevy with it. It's stood up to a few washes and weather so far. I like the spray head on the Flexidip better. It's a more traditional spray pattern, not flat like Plastidip.

Also, on the first test of this product, I am not too pleased. It runs WAY too easily and goes on way too thin. The part I worked on is drying, so I will check on it tomorrow and give an update then.
I will agree with you that it does start out thin. I applied 2 coats before I was satisfied with the look, and I did 3 more just for strength.
 

Zaff

Well-Known Member
I haven't tried this, but I have considered Rustoleum's "leak seal" product as a less expensive and more readily available (in my area anyway) alternative to Plastidip, but not having the funds at this point to get any materials, I haven't been able to do any testing to see how well it works and compare the results with testimonials of how well (or poorly in some cases) Plastidip does. It may prove to be less watery than the Flexidip while still being less costly than the Plastidip, but I don't know for certain.
 

Courage

New Member
I found that it does not seal as well, requiring more coats. Although this is a nonissue, it comes out to be a flat color as opposed to plasti-dips glossy look. The spray head is weird and is non-compatible with that of plastidip, although that's more the fault of plastidip for having a no traditional attachment.

In short, for the same price, I'll take plastidip any day
 

WandererTJ

Well-Known Member
EVAkura, I was wondering if you could give an update on how it turned out after you let it sit for a while. You said you'd share an update but I never saw one.

As an added bonus, it would be great if you shared your recommendation of use with this project, such as "I recommend", "I recommend only if...", or I do NOT recommend".
 
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RYNO 666

Well-Known Member
It works great. Pros it has a smooth texture and goes on nice and evenly. Cons it requires much more product to achieve the same result and it is not as durable.
I used it on my Mark vii
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EVAkura

RCO
405th Regiment Officer
EVAkura, I was wondering if you could give an update on how it turned out after you let it sit for a while. You said you'd share an update but I never saw one.

As an added bonus, it would be great if you shared your recommendation of use with this project, such as "I recommend", "I recommend only if...", or I do NOT recommend".
Sorry about that Wanderer, I have so many projects going on, and this seemed to get lost in the sauce :)

Since I am not a great proponent of Plasti-dip anyways, my review may be a bit bias. But I will attempt to stick to just the facts.

This product goes on thin, runs easily, and avoids detail lines like the plague.

As I was covering my Ironman helmet with it (it already had several thin coats of PVA), there were areas that would accept the product just fine, and others that seemed to not allow it to adhere at all (It was very clean before I started). I noticed that it would not go into my detail lines at all, thus leaving them devoid of any coverage. I also noticed that the few places where my PVA had cracked due to the stress of me trying on the helmet before I applied this product, it did not cover those cracks either. In other words, it seems where ever there may be a gap, even the smallest of them, it will not cover and/or conceal them without having to apply many coats... which will greatly increase the chance of more runs.

So, my recommendation would be: I only recommend this product if you are using it on a non detail piece that is mostly flat, other than that, I would avoid it totally.

Next up for testing will be Snow-roof coating. I have no timeline for testing this product yet, but it will eventually happen. I have used it before when I coated my RV roof, and it appears to have very similar properties as Plasti-dip paint on coating, but would be much less expensive, and possibly easier to work with.
 
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I have recently tried it myself with two seperate tests. The first was straight on to unsealed EVA foam and the other was on foam with a quick coating of PVA glue. They were both left over night to dry completely and were spread evenly (or as close to even as possible). The results speak for themselves.
Recommendation: multiple coats to smooth out the first application.
I don't remember which was which but I couldn't recommend a better substitute to Plasti-Dip. Question, why hasn't anyone posted pics like these before?
IMG_0920.jpg IMG_0921.jpg
 

RYNO 666

Well-Known Member
Yes I have use Flexi Dip as well as Plasti Dip both are a little bit different. Flexi Dip is not as durable and requires more coats but it lays on smooth and doesn't have as much of a texter. Plasti Dip is much easier to use but like I said has a texture and it's much thicker

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RYNO 666

Well-Known Member
The trick is to seal up the foam with a heat gun first before you start applying either product because otherwise it eats into the foam. And you're very first coats must be as thin and light as possible

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electricknite

Member
I first used flexidip because i couldn't find plastidip at first. I found that the flexidip spray cap got clogged up by the product. I had to soak it in paint thinner after each use just to keep it working which was the biggest pain ever. Plastidips spray cap is awesome, i haven't checked whether i can swap out the caps between the two cans yet but I think I might try it sometime. I like the finish of the flexidip more. It requires more coats but where I live the flexidip can is 8$ cheaper than plastidip and it goes on smoother it seams, just don't go nuts with it and let it run.

To me, the pros and cons weigh each other out. if the caps are interchangeable and that works I'll probably just stick with flexidip though and use the plastidip cap.

Also, heat sealing EVA foam before adding plastidip will make the finish much smoother.
 

Ashuraa

Judicial Officer
Division Staff
Honestly do do NOT have to use plastidip or flexiDip on your foam projects. You can get very nice results with going with a sandable primer that says it is FOR plastic, such as Rustoleum. It will not eat into your foam, and it will give you a good sealing and be ready then for any other paint you may wish to put down.
 
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