Hello EVERYONE, 1st set lets go!!! Q & A

Kenshow6873

New Member
Hello everyone my name is Kenshow and I have started this process of pepakura last year, and I had my ups and downs, made some mistakes but I have learned. I'll post what I have done in the past but my real question is, what material should I use. I have done some more research into the process and I have come up with three results. I have seen people using cardboard, cardstock, or foam. Which one would anyone recommend and why and if you have pictures that would help too. Thank you in advance.
 

Benton188

RMO
405th Regiment Officer
Hello Kenshow,
It really all depends on what you plan on making. If you have been dabbling in pepakura for over a year then you should know it's ups and downs. I personally only use cardstock for making helmets or masks, and EVA foam for just about everything else. Getting into foam work isn't hard, it just takes a little practice and getting used to swapping everything over from the cardstock style. Like I said at the beginning, it really depends on what you're trying to make.
 

Spartan X

New Member
Hi and welcome to the 405th!
As for your question, it all depends on what you actually want for your armor. Foam is less time consuming and more flexible but you'll some times have to sacrifice some details. Cardstock takes more time and require more tools and space as you will have to you use some toxic stuff but you'll be able to have an armor that is more detailed and helmets generally look a lot better when using carstock over foam. As for cardboard, I wouldn't recommend it unless you're on a low budget because it breaks easily.
But remember, do as you prefer because you're the one building and wearing the armor. I also recommend you to read a lot on this website because it will make your build a lot easier.
Once again, welcome and have fun!
 

CommanderPalmer

Well-Known Member
I don't recommend anything. I rather say people should do research themselves and choose what they want to try working with. Also it depends on time they want to spend on the costume - you can rush with both foam and cardstock.

Personally I work with cardstock, because I can do it finer and better than with foam, even if it takes more time. I know if I would have done it with foam, my costume wouldn't even look half as good.
 

MrHolmes

New Member
Hello everyone, just wanted to jump in here and ask a question. I am looking to start making a set of ODST armor, I am going to make the helmet out off card stock using pepakura and the rest off the armor in foam. I was just wondering what thickness off foam would be best, would 8mm do or does it just depend on what the piece of armor's shape is ?
 

Bobby Boucher

Member
Welcome Kenshow! I'll give my 2 cents. I've made the majority of my armor out of pep, but I've adopted a mix of techniques since I am making my legs out of foam for comfort and weight. I've also used both foam and pep for the chest piece. As far as recommendations go it's hard for me to give you one. Experiment and see what you like! But I would explore using multiple techniques
 

CPO mendez

Member
Welcome to the community, Kenshow! My advice is to start with foam. it's widely seen as a good "beginner" method. it's also better to start with because you don't need to have all the (expensive) safety equipment and overhead that you need to work with resin and fiberglass. it's also easier to "bully" into place, compared to card stick. you can make lots of mistakes that EVA foam will stretch or scrunch up to accommodate. It's also WAY lighter than resin/bondo, and actually insulates heat REALLY well. it's also generally more comfortable. it tends to bend and flex, instead of digging into you. As for buying it, this is what i buy. bought about $70 worth in 2014, got me through an Iron Man Mk. 6, a War machine suit that had to have half of it remade because of scaling problems, and i still got a few sheets around, so a little goes a long way. hot glue works the best on it, which is even cheaper and more easily accessible. i got more tips and tricks for foam, but this is about as much i can think of relative to what you're asking for. hope it helps!
 

Kenshow6873

New Member
Thank you so much for your feedback, I really apperciate it. I have another question because of the difference between the two materials I know card stock once folded can hold more of the detail once completed but does the same happen with the foam or is there more carving and cutting involved in that process? As well as if I were use foam what "Thickness" should i use.
 

Kenshow6873

New Member
Re: Hello EVERYONE, 1st set lets go!!! Q & A

Ah, SO I was finally able to post up my first pep project I started a year ago, and this is how it came out. It came out bigger than expected but at least its a start. Any criticism or ideas. I really appreciate the feedback.
IMG_0166.JPGIMG_0295.JPGIMG_0372.JPG
 

Sierra 165

Jr Member
Hey guys I've got a Question does anyone know how to modify a pepakura template for a foam build is it easy or ....
 

Bimbie

New Member
you can make lots of mistakes that EVA foam will stretch or scrunch up to accommodate. It's also WAY lighter than resin/bondo, and actually insulates heat REALLY well.
I'm doing my research on Foam Vs Resin as well, and I would love if someone could clarify cpom's comment about foam INSULATES HEAT.
Does that mean it will keep you warm in cool north states,
or that it will keep heat OUT in the Texas Summer Swelter ?

Intuitively, I am guessing Foam would be hotter to wear in Texas than Resin... as in- both are hot but foam is hotter.
January PAX-South is a reasonable temperature in Texas, but July RTX is an obscene temp in Texas
 

CommanderPalmer

Well-Known Member
I'm doing my research on Foam Vs Resin as well, and I would love if someone could clarify cpom's comment about foam INSULATES HEAT.
Does that mean it will keep you warm in cool north states,
or that it will keep heat OUT in the Texas Summer Swelter ?

Intuitively, I am guessing Foam would be hotter to wear in Texas than Resin... as in- both are hot but foam is hotter.
January PAX-South is a reasonable temperature in Texas, but July RTX is an obscene temp in Texas
It will rather make you very hot faster and the chance of overheating is higher and you should drink more often to not dehydrate. (some MarkV's in my regiment put multiple fans inside their chests to not overheat, because it was getting very hot for them.)
Foam is lighter and more comfortable, sure but fiberglassed is heavier and it won't be so warm inside.

This is my impression, but also this is what I've heard from people who made both foam and fiberglass costumes.

I personally rather take the weight over heat.
 

CPO mendez

Member
I'm doing my research on Foam Vs Resin as well, and I would love if someone could clarify cpom's comment about foam INSULATES HEAT.
Does that mean it will keep you warm in cool north states,
or that it will keep heat OUT in the Texas Summer Swelter ?

Intuitively, I am guessing Foam would be hotter to wear in Texas than Resin... as in- both are hot but foam is hotter.
January PAX-South is a reasonable temperature in Texas, but July RTX is an obscene temp in Texas

Lemme answer it for ya! foam actually ISN'T hotter to wear than resin. and i've tested this in the EXACT place you're talking about, austin texas in July for RTX. i had a character mashup of Iron man and War machine, both foam, with an elmer's glue mixture as a hard-coat plastic sealant. while walking around outside in iron man, i was pretty hot inside, but nothing out of the ordinary, yet when my friend reached out and touched the shoulder pad to get my attention, he BURNED his hand enough to get a few tiny blisters. now, i'm not sure if this is because of the EVA foam itself, or the more reflective plastic-shell coating and paint job, but this past RTX, when i was in War machine with the same paintjob, but with a 3D printed helmet, when walking outside i felt like my brain was being cooked by the helmet! also, to quell your woes about the austin heat at RTX, RoosterTeeth, either by accident or as an act of mercy on their cosplayers, keeps the convention center FRIGID cold! it's amazing! walking through the doors from outside is like walking into a freezer! hope this helps!

Also, obligatory pic of the character mashup suits:
7ZsbTVD.jpg
 

Bimbie

New Member
Thanx ComP and CPOM
(wow, odd how those can abrev... yeah, I know it should be cdr but couldnt resist)

I figured the big difference would be the pep-resin having more empty space for 30mm fans and airflow inside.
 

serenko3

RCO
405th Regiment Officer
If you have the time and money try each way and get a good feel of each build method. trial and error is how im working on things, and taking some advice on the way.
 

Ruby

New Member
I made my helmet using the pepakura method with resin, fiberglass, and bondo. I think this was a good place to start because it gave me an idea of how each of these pieces on the pages (cardstock) would fold into becoming a 3D object. I would rather use cardstock than cardboard because I feel as though is is easier to work with and you can get different kinds of folds which you might not be able to get with thicker cardboard.

I used the foam method for the rest of my armor. This was much simpler and less time consuming than the pepakura method because you build the piece and that is basically it after you seal it and paint it. With pepakura, I think you should harden it and apply bondo to give it more detail so there ae more steps than just gluing the paper. Foam is also much, much lighter. I have heard people who had full pepakura suits with resin, fiberglass, and bondo have gouges on their shoulders from the weight of the chest piece.

In the end, it is all up to you. Each has their benefits. I haven't had a hard suit but I would recommend is for any part of your body that move, put a flexible material (like foam) there. For something more stationary like your head, I would do pepakura with resin, fiberglass, and bondo.
 
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