How hot should a heat gun be for EVA Foam?

Yuraichu

New Member
I saw a small heat gun that was going for an affordable price but I am unsure if it is suitable for EVA foam. The packaging states 200-300 Celsius (392-572 Fahrenheit), is this enough for EVA foam?
 

PlanetAlexander

RMO
405th Regiment Officer
I'm not too sure what temps one needs, but I know it should be hotter than a hair dryer but not as hot as a flamethrower. The one I use has a dial from 1-5 with a range of temps you can choose from. I imagine what you're looking at would be good - of course, be careful when handling it, especially for the first time.
 

Yuraichu

New Member
I'm not too sure what temps one needs, but I know it should be hotter than a hair dryer but not as hot as a flamethrower. The one I use has a dial from 1-5 with a range of temps you can choose from. I imagine what you're looking at would be good - of course, be careful when handling it, especially for the first time.
I see, many thanks for the insight and advice :D
 

MataraOkina

New Member
That should be a good heat setting for a heat gun to start bending foam. I have this Wagner model I got forever ago that does 750 - and 1000 F (about 400-500 C) and at the lower setting it takes a couple minutes, , while at high it takes about 30-45 seconds, for the foam to heat up enough enough to where it can bend and be formed. At 200-300 C it should work too, you just gotta give it a few minutes until you see the inside of the foam start to bubble a little or darken, then it's hot enough to bend.

But yes, do practice caution, and you absolutely do not want to be heating something on the ground or the table, you wanna hold it up in the air, lest you burn your carpet or table.
 

Coreforge

Member
200-300°C should absolutely be enough for EVA. I'm using a hot air rework station that I have set to about 200°C, and it works fine. For complex curves, a little bit hotter would be good, but I don't think I ever went over 300°C on foam, as it'll also start to get burned at those temperatures, and that smells really bad. From trying to extrude eva once, it melts as much as it does at around 200°C and already starts to slightly burn at 230°C, so since hot air has a bit worse thermal transfer, 200-300°C is perfectly fine for working with foam.
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

Top