New but not unfamiliar project

Nuts4Accuracy

Active Member
Hello everyone, just wanted to let you have a sneak peek at a project I'm working on. Since I've managed to save up more money, I'm finally able to shift gears and be hopeful for the future and do something I love.

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I wonder what it is :whistle:;)
 

Nuts4Accuracy

Active Member
Looks like you're printing a matrix mold for a Mjolnir helmet?

Bahahha yes, i'd thought id save buying $30-$40 of clay by instead printing a hard shell using a 1kg of cheap filament.

This will help keep the helmet centred whilst I make a fibreglass jacket over it, then i simply have to remove half of "matrix print" and pour silicone through the jacket. I have more control over the thickness of silicone by 3d modelling it, so when it comes to actually pouring silicone im saving us much as possible.


As I have moved recently, I will have to set up my 3D printer shortly. I did run into an issue last time I used it, but forgot was it was before i packed it down for transport.
 

Hein B287

Active Member
remove half of "matrix print
is it just for making the silicone mould or will it also be used during casting to add some stability? in that case you could split the model in half and add some connection holes along the top ridge. would at least save some time cutting it
 

Nuts4Accuracy

Active Member
is it just for making the silicone mould or will it also be used during casting to add some stability? in that case you could split the model in half and add some connection holes along the top ridge. would at least save some time cutting it

It will be used for molding the outer fiberglass jacket accurately. I'm using a 3D printed piece in place of clay basically. So once the Fiberglass 2-piece jacket is done, One-Half of the 3d printed shell (Because it will be a 2-piece silicone mold as well) can be removed to expose a cavity between the jacket and the actual helmet. Brush a print layer of silicone, and re-assemble the jacket. That cavity will then have silicone poured into from an opening on the fiberglass jacket (Likely a 3" hole)

I could go for a Plaster jacket to be even cheaper, but to maintain the strength of the jacket, heaps of plaster would have to be used. But man, a massive plaster jacket would just be heavy to slush cast.
 
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Off Earth

Active Member
It will be used for molding the outer fiberglass jacket accurately. I'm using a 3D printed piece in place of clay basically. So once the Fiberglass 2-piece jacket is done, One-Half of the 3d printed shell (Because it will be a 2-piece silicone mold as well) can be removed to expose a cavity between the jacket and the actual helmet. Brush a print layer of silicone, and re-assemble the jacket. That cavity will then have silicone poured into from an opening on the fiberglass jacket (Likely a 3" hole)

I could go for a Plaster jacket to be even cheaper, but to maintain the strength of the jacket, heaps of plaster would have to be used. But man, a massive plaster jacket would just be heavy to slush cast.
You shouldn’t need a fiberglass jacket. Add you pour spout, bleeders, and a place for your model to sit. This is your jacket.

Here’s an example of what I mean.
 

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Nuts4Accuracy

Active Member
You shouldn’t need a fiberglass jacket. Add you pour spout, bleeders, and a place for your model to sit. This is your jacket.

Here’s an example of what I mean.
I was thinking of that; unfortunately, my 3D printer isn't big enough to print it in 1 go, and I'm not really fond of the strength of glues to hold a multi-piece jacket together since I am very clumsy with my hands.

But I won't discredit that idea, it is definitely a viable method for smaller props like pistols. Besides that; I was balancing the costs of a fibreglass matt vs.... a carbon fibre matt. And the idea of making a carbon fibre jacket definitely has appeal to it, not going to lie bahaha, even if it is aesthetics.
 

Nuts4Accuracy

Active Member
Now; I've finalized my "Blur" 3D model to be ready for printing. So you probably guessed correctly that after 2 years, I am molding the Halo 2 Anniversary Cinematic Version of the Mk VI. It was hell and a half to get it right. The amount examining cutscenes after cutscenes to get it right. I even had to redo the visor 3 times.
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one issue. I don't know whether to go to the spartan scale or the human scale.

So I'm trying to balance the probabilities that a 6ft (182cm) person trying to cosplay as master chief with steep boots and a helmet will barely reach 2 metres tall (6ft 8") Both a human scale and spartan scale helmet are doable.

But not all people are 6ft or taller and not alot of people design armors to make themselves look taller. So for shorter people the helmet will look comically large. I'm basically have a "infinity gauntlet" scale issue.




Both 6ft mannquins; Human scale left, spartan scale right.
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Which would you prefer the helmet to be finalised at?
 
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PlanetAlexander

RMO
405th Regiment Officer
I'd definitely recommend human scale. It's what a lot of helmet casts are based on to make them more realistic for cosplays, plus it means it should fit for larger heads, and not be too much larger for small ones.
 

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