Polyurethane or Fiberglass?

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rvb4life

Well-Known Member
Hi everyone.......im having a dilemma here.

Im making pepakura armor, and i need finish it, but since im low on money, should i use polyurethane and spray it, or go with the fiberglass? whoever used poly spray, does it help?

i think if its worth doing, its worth doing right.

If anyone can give me some pros, please tell me. which is stronger, and which is easier to use.

my dad says that poly is just like a plastic layer, and i want something sturdy.
 

Epyon

Jr Member
although I don't know a lot about using polyurethane.....I know that fiberglass can be extremely strong. First of all, Fiberglass is as strong as you want it to be...
If you put enough layers into it, you can make it almost indestructible; and I know that 2-4 layers of the stuff, properly resined, can take as many paintball shots as you want to take to it.

So, hopefully someone with polyurethane experience will chip in, but I opt for Fiberglass cause I can make it as strong as I want to, and it's pretty cheap if you just want it to hold its shape for a regular costume.

$10 can of resin + $6 for 8 sq. ft. of Fiberglass = A helmet with at least 2-3 layers of fiberglass inside of it, and probably more.

Hope this helps give you some idea...

~Epyon
 
Epyon said:
although I don't know a lot about using polyurethane.....I know that fiberglass can be extremely strong. First of all, Fiberglass is as strong as you want it to be...
If you put enough layers into it, you can make it almost indestructible; and I know that 2-4 layers of the stuff, properly resined, can take as many paintball shots as you want to take to it.

So, hopefully someone with polyurethane experience will chip in, but I opt for Fiberglass cause I can make it as strong as I want to, and it's pretty cheap if you just want it to hold its shape for a regular costume.

$10 can of resin + $6 for 8 sq. ft. of Fiberglass = A helmet with at least 2-3 layers of fiberglass inside of it, and probably more.

Hope this helps give you some idea...

~Epyon


hes correct fiberglass is incredibly strong but only about 2 layers will withstand paintball
 
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tbail1989

Jr Member
thisismadness2 said:
hes correct fiberglass is incredibly strong but only about 2 layers will withstand paintball
yes go with the fiberglass, It will be a stronger source of support
 
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Robogenisis

Well-Known Member
Fiberglass FTW. :)
I don't know about the polyurethane, but fiberglass is VERY strong.

On a side note, if 2 layers can take on a paintball, what could 10 layers take??? (and how heavy would it be?) :)
 

Epyon

Jr Member
Sweet....didnt know what the paintball min was.....but of course, i'm assuming those 2 layers has some bondo on the outside as well :p

10 layers???? Holy cow, Robo! That's like the weight of steel and I'd wager that it could take some low caliber shots.... o.0

Good grief!

I'm making mine as durable as all get out, and i'm debating somewhere between 4-6 layers on different spots of the armor...

~Epyon
 

Robogenisis

Well-Known Member
Epyon said:
Sweet....didnt know what the paintball min was.....but of course, i'm assuming those 2 layers has some bondo on the outside as well

10 layers???? Holy cow, Robo! That's like the weight of steel and I'd wager that it could take some low caliber shots.... o.0

Good grief!

I'm making mine as durable as all get out, and i'm debating somewhere between 4-6 layers on different spots of the armor...
~Epyon


I'm going to do some tests to see how many layers of fiberglass it takes to withstand certain things.
In mind right now are BB/Pellet gun, paintball gun, airsoft gun, and my .22 cal. Then I will post the results here just so you guys know what will take what. (Maybe wieght too) :)
 
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rvb4life

Well-Known Member
nobody knows about poly?

ugh......maybe glassing it is the only option.
i do want more input though.







you guys are the best.
 

rvb4life

Well-Known Member
no, resin is strictly for fiberglass, but poly is like for wood finishing, to protect it.


i think that poly is like that minwax stuff or something that coats wood in plastic to protect from weathering.







i think thats really all it is. shouldnt be as toxic, but still smellier and a bit more flimsy.
 

dacacheman

Jr Member
fumes would be a def issue with sprayable poly. its bad enough with polyester auto resin, i cant imagine the amount of aerosol going in your lungs with polyurethane
 

Darth Malevelus

Active Member
poly is bad stuff point blank, its principle gas off agent (when it dries) is cyanide gas. DONT USE IT WITH OUT PROPER PPE!!! The military uses it for painting aircraft. You have to maintain a 50 foot perimeter outdoors!!! You have to use specialized positive ventilation suits, with an external air supply over 50 foot away and up wind, and use monitors to make sure you dont keel over.


Its ilegal in the automotive industry to use it for cars. Its great paint but its soooo toxic its been banned
 

Sigma LS

Sr Member
Fiberglass resin is a form of polyurethane resin. (You'll need polyfiber or fiberglass to add some strength)


I think your question is really more of what type of Polyurethane resin to use.

I've never tried the spray resin but it looks like it might work well. For pure volume weight you get for the cash though, I'd go with the regular stuff.

EDIT: There are lots of kinds of polyurethane resin :casting resins, shelacs etc. each is different based on the purpose.
 

rvb4life

Well-Known Member
so.......there is good poly and cyanide poly.......

the big question is.......what pays off in the long run? Spray poly or fiberglass?


i DEFINITLEY dont wanna DIE making my armor, so im not sure which is safer.





oh......and dont boats only use like, a few layers of glass? jesus......10!? a nuke couldnt break it!
 

Sarge Christi

Well-Known Member
Go for fiberglassing on this project.
Most people that use plastic (that's basically what polyeurothane is), do it for molds.
Fiberglassing would be WAY easier for what you're doing.
I'd say give it about 3 good coats of fiberglass and you're good.

But remember, which each coat of fiberglass you add, the heavier your stuff will get.
;)
 

tsau mia

Member
I used one coat of fiberglass, and a WHOLE LOT of bondo. I just poured it right in over the fiberglass so I wouldn't have to touch it. My helmet is as hard as a rock, believe me, and I've dropped it a few times already. I'm more worried about the visor breaking off than the helmet breaking. just make sure that your fiberglass dries right up against the pepakura or layer of bondo or whatever. If you get air bubbles, straightening that out will not be fun. so just use an old paintbrush, or your stirring stick to keep it flat against the inside surface.
MOST IMPORTANT: don't forget your gear. you know the drill: eye protection, respirator, old clothes, gloves, anything else you might need. It just helps, you know, in case you want to have kids later (at like 25) and see them get married when they grow up (at like 50) and watch your grandkiddies grow up (by like 75). Wow, seems like times of our lives go in the 25's. fun. Just don't do anything stupid to make sure you aren't around that long.
 

dacacheman

Jr Member
just out of curiousity, lets say i havent used any protection and have been resining and bondoing and sanding for the past 6 months. what kind of medical issues could i develop?
 

rvb4life

Well-Known Member
if you have been breathing in the fumes.....well......you are......how do i say.......#@$%ed.

from what i hear, you have shards of fiberglass in your lungs and extremities.

have fun with that.



thats my main problem. i dont want to die or anything bad while making my armor.

im 16. I HAVE A LOT TO LIVE FOR!
 

Nojuego

New Member
Sweet....didnt know what the paintball min was.....but of course, i'm assuming those 2 layers has some bondo on the outside as well tongue.gif

10 layers???? Holy cow, Robo! That's like the weight of steel and I'd wager that it could take some low caliber shots.... o.0

Good grief!

I'm making mine as durable as all get out, and i'm debating somewhere between 4-6 layers on different spots of the armor...

~Epyon

Type I
(.22 LR; .380 ACP) This armor protects against 22 caliber Long Rifle Lead Round Nose (LR LRN) bullets, with nominal masses of 2.6 g (40 gr) at a reference velocity of 329 m/s (1080 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and .380 ACP Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose (FMJ RN) bullets, with nominal masses of 6.2 g (95 gr) at a reference velocity of 322 m/s (1055 ft/s ± 30 ft/s)

Type IIA
(9 mm; .40 S&W) This armor protects against 9 mm Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose (FMJ RN) bullets, with nominal masses of 8.0 g (124 gr) at a reference velocity of 341 m/s (1120 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and .40 S&W caliber Full Metal Jacketed (FMJ) bullets, with nominal masses of 11.7 g (180 gr) at a reference velocity of 322 m/s (1055 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against the threats mentioned in [Type I].

Type II
(9 mm; .357 Magnum) This armor protects against 9 mm Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose (FMJ RN) bullets, with nominal masses of 8.0 g (124 gr) at a reference velocity of 367 m/s (1205 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 357 Magnum Jacketed Soft Point (JSP) bullets, with nominal masses of 10.2 g (158 gr) at a reference velocity of 436 m/s (1430 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against the threats mentioned in [Types I and IIA].

Type IIIA
(High Velocity 9 mm; .44 Magnum) This armor protects against 9 mm Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose (FMJ RN) bullets, with nominal masses of 8.0 g (124 gr) at a reference velocity of 436 m/s (1430 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and .44 Magnum Semi Jacketed Hollow Point (SJHP) bullets, with nominal masses of 15.6 g (240 gr) at a reference velocity of 436 m/s (1430 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against most handgun threats, as well as the threats mentioned in [Types I, IIA, and II].

Type III
(Rifles) This armor protects against 7.62 mm Full Metal Jacketed (FMJ) bullets (U.S. Military designation M80), with nominal masses of 9.6 g (148 gr) at a reference velocity of 847 m/s (2780 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) or less. It also provides protection against the threats mentioned in [Types I, IIA, II, and IIIA].

Type IV
(Armor Piercing Rifle) This armor protects against .30 caliber armor piercing (AP) bullets (U.S. Military designation M2 AP), with nominal masses of 10.8 g (166 gr) at a reference velocity of 878 m/s (2880 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides at least single hit protection against the threats mentioned in [Types I, IIA, II, IIIA, and III

This is a list of the US standards for ballistics armor classes. Type IIA is about 16 layers of Kevlar while type IIIA is 30. 10 layers of fiberglass might not cut it even for type I. I've been toying with the idea of making the Halo armor actually functional with a type IIIA undersuit and type IV plates covering vital areas(chest/head/spine). With the undersuit backing up the heavy armor pieces, the entire ensemble would be able to withstand more than type IV and i've even been working on a way to deflect forces in the chest and back to make it even more resistant. All together the project would probably cost me about 2 grand and weigh under 100 lbs. It makes me wonder why the military spends tens of thousands on armor for one soldier. I even found a type IIIA visor which would be perfect for the helmet.
 
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