Questionable cast/installation technique

Hey everyone, so I was thinking today, and came up with a technique but I need to ask a few questions. I'm trying to make a cast that has all the electronics (lights, fans) and visor literally built or casted into it.
This was my idea.
1. Make a thin cast of the helmet
2. Cut out the visor, install proper visor
3. Install LED's and fans
4. Now here come's my idea. Mask up the parts like the visor and rim of the helmet, and rotocast a few more layers, until the wires and lights, and gaps between the visor and rim of the visor cut out are completely concealed/filled in. Then paint.
This way, the electronics and visor are literally built into the helmet.
My questions are if the polyurethane is hot enough to warp the visor or destroy the installations. If there is anything else I am overlooking, please let me know.
What do you think?
 
Repairs! :)
If you do it like this, then it has to work. No second chance, at least none that looks good.
Yeah, the installations would have to be failproof. I've had experience with faulty electronics, and it's a pain. Especially with this, since, there's no going back.
The battery holders/sockets would definitely remain uncovered. Probably by covering them with masking tape while doing the second rotocast, then removing the masking after the cast is completed.
Thanks for the feedback
 
The other issue is unmasking the visor once it is covered in resin. That would be finicky to say the least.
My idea was to wait until the polyurethane was at the point where it's curing and thick; thick enough to stay where it is, and go in with gloves and a knife to get it just right. I might do a trial run on this.

Brandon, I know you also have experience casting. Would you say that the heat from the polyurethane gets high enough to warp anything?
 

Liamthedevastator

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a great idea, but what if you cast a slightly thicker pull, then just dremel the wire-paths and stuff so that you can cover it with, lets say, velcro stripping? Put a strip of velcro on either side of the cut, install electronics, put single opposing velco piece over the cuts, blend the underside of the top velcro (pointing out) so that it matches the inside of the helm?

Ever though of making an external part of the helm removable instead? Could add to the realism while centralizing electronics. Also frees up the interior of the helm to be made as aesthetically pleasing as possible (because, admittedly, the inside is generally finished to "function" rather than "function + aesthetic pleasure).

Just some alternatives
 
Sounds like a great idea, but what if you cast a slightly thicker pull, then just dremel the wire-paths and stuff so that you can cover it with, lets say, velcro stripping? Put a strip of velcro on either side of the cut, install electronics, put single opposing velco piece over the cuts, blend the underside of the top velcro (pointing out) so that it matches the inside of the helm?

Ever though of making an external part of the helm removable instead? Could add to the realism while centralizing electronics. Also frees up the interior of the helm to be made as aesthetically pleasing as possible (because, admittedly, the inside is generally finished to "function" rather than "function + aesthetic pleasure).

Just some alternatives
Yeah, that's what I've been doing with my other helmets, installing them after the casting. I really want to try to make the entire helmet aesthetically pleasing, not just the outside. After watching a lot of Halo Reach cutscenes, I feel inspired to make a helmet as close to the game helmet as humanely possible, which means the interior would have to be pleasing as well. It's just something new I'd like to try.

And regarding external components, here's a thread I made today about an external idea I had.
http://www.405th.com/showthread.php/30592-Alternate-method-to-power-helmet
 
I would rather stick to hiding my wires under my padding on the inside, and the reason for that is what if I short out a wire or a lead or a connection... then it is too much of a hassle to fix things when they are submerged in thick resin
 
i think liamthedevastator's idea is the best bet for what you want to do. Also, since you want it to be aesthetically pleasing, you should cut the "trenches" into the inside of the helmet like liam said, and place the wires in there, holding them in using velcro strips (once more, like liam said). Then, to make it have that pleasing look, you should look into motorcycle helmet liners. Scorpion has some really good ones for about $30. They look professional, and are comfortable (from what I heard) and a correct fit will keep the helmet snug on your head.
 

Liamthedevastator

Well-Known Member
This is Scorpion. It's a company that makes these awesome helmet liners that are actually quite cheap (and appear to come in a variety of colours and patterns...interesting). For $35 how can you go wrong?

Online is always a good bet. If you go to a store I imagine you'll likely pay a weee bit more, but not much (unless they're a. ripping you off or b. selling a legitimately higher quality product).
 
Scorpian is a motorcycle helmet company. The sell all kinds of helmet liners (and helmets if you so please). the liners are what I personally consider to be a reasonable price. I don't own one of their liners, but I've heard that they are very comfortable. Here's a link to one of their helmet liners. They also have a website, so you can check that out. They average to about 30 bucks a piece. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001YAXVW4/ref=noref?ie=UTF8&s=automotive&psc=1
enjoy :)

(here's one inside of a helmet.)
41cEXFS0syL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
 

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Jeddychan

Jr Member
You could also take some really small metal tubing thats about the size of a straw, and embed that into your helmet, then run wires through them after the helmet is cast. That way, it looks pleasing, but if something goes wrong, you can pull your wires out of the tubes.
 
You could also take some really small metal tubing thats about the size of a straw, and embed that into your helmet, then run wires through them after the helmet is cast. That way, it looks pleasing, but if something goes wrong, you can pull your wires out of the tubes.
I kind of did something similar to that on one of my helmets, but with PVS pipe insulator. It acted as padding as well.

Thanks guys, I had never heard of Scorpion before today. Helped a lot, I just put in an order
 
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