Smoothing Saturation Lines in PLA 3d Prints (evakura tutorial)

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
This process was not developed by me. It was developed and shown to me by EVAkura who authorized me to write up a tutorial. It has since been used by many who immediately contact him thanking him for the hours of sanding he has saved and how cheap and accessible the products are.



Materials:
3d Printed Part
Krylon Triple Thick Glaze
Krylon Chalky Finish Spray Paint

Krylon.jpeg Chalky.jpg


*Disclaimer: For these photos I did 0% sanding just to show you what the results can be with the least amount of effort. Trust me, you will get better results if you sand your part in between any or all coats of Glaze/Paint.


This process is similar to using thick filler spray paint, but is more controlled which results in better kept edge detail. There is some sort of reaction that happens when spraying these two Krylon products together while they are still wet that helps it autolevel when drying.



20190223_160627.jpg Here is an uncoated, PLA 3d print. Take a hobby knife or craft knife to it to knock off any supports or overprints that should not be part of your final piece.


Step 1: Spray it with the Triple Thick Glaze enough to coat, but not enough to pool. Keep the can 12” away from part and try aiming for the hard to reach parts first.

Step 2: Immediately (before the glaze dries) spray the part with the Chalk Paint in a light dusting. Keep the can 18”-24” away from part and do not hold down nozzle for long periods.

Step 3: Let dry completely and sand with 220 grit if desired.


Repeat all above steps 3-4 times
. On the last coat sand with 320 grit if desired.

I used a heat gun at medium setting from a couple feet away, just to help the drying process along.

20190223_161353.jpg 1st coat of Glaze+Chalk (let dry 5-7 minutes)
20190223_162746.jpg 2nd coat of Glaze+Chalk (let dry 7-10 minutes)
20190223_164203.jpg 3rd coat of Glaze+Chalk (let dry 10-12 minutes)
20190223_170047.jpg 4th coat of Glaze+Chalk (let dry 15 minutes)


Step 4: Select your final paint and test a small section to see if there are any reactions to the glaze/chalk layers. I have seen standard Acrylic Spray Paint as well as Automotive Enamel Spray Paint work with no issues.

20190224_095637.jpg I sprayed my test on the lower left corner and then sanded it off once dried.

Step 5: Spray paint your piece with 1-2 coats of paint following the directions of your paint.

20190224_173207.jpg Again, this is with no sanding between layers. Sand between layers for even better results.


And you're done!



20190223_160612.jpg Here is another photo just to show you that a splotchy pattern between layers is normal.
 

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TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
I'm trying out this method on a project that I'm working on with a friend and the results are fantastic.
DSC_0568.JPG
For larger pieces we sanded through my normal procedure but for thin and brittle parts we went straight to this method and it's staggering. Thank you for writing this out.
DSC_0569.JPG
For the Canadian readers, the Krylon Crystal Triple Thick Clear Glaze and Krylon Chalky Finish Misty Grey are confirmed the same this side of the border as what PerniciousDuke describes. Both can be found at Michael's.
 

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Omnijobs

New Member
Have you tried instead of chalk paint using filler primer? I'll certainly test it myself I just wondering if it works in a different or better/worse way than the chalk paint does.
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Have you tried instead of chalk paint using filler primer? I'll certainly test it myself I just wondering if it works in a different or better/worse way than the chalk paint does.
Since Krylon Triple Thick Glaze seems to be unavailable in Western Canada as of the past three months and moving to Rustoleum 2 in 1 Filler Primer I can safely say I much prefer this chalk and glaze method. It's quicker and forms a harder surface when fully cured.
 

Omnijobs

New Member
Since Krylon Triple Thick Glaze seems to be unavailable in Western Canada as of the past three months and moving to Rustoleum 2 in 1 Filler Primer I can safely say I much prefer this chalk and glaze method. It's quicker and forms a harder surface when fully cured.
Thanks I'll definitely have to try it and stock pile some for future projects.
 

NobleTravis

Member
So I tested this out tonight and honestly,

You get better results on PLA using XTC 3D or a similar epoxy resin. Anything self-leveling works as good with less fuss going about it the Evakura way.

While a I respect the ingenuity of this, the price point for one can of each, Chalky is $12, Triple Glaze being $10, you’re in the same ballpark as XTC 3D.
 

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
So I tested this out tonight and honestly,

You get better results on PLA using XTC 3D or a similar epoxy resin. Anything self-leveling works as good with less fuss going about it the Evakura way.

While a I respect the ingenuity of this, the price point for one can of each, Chalky is $12, Triple Glaze being $10, you’re in the same ballpark as XTC 3D.
I'm sorry to hear it didn't work better for you, but I appreciate the feedback.

The prices must be a regional thing. I can get the Chalky for $6 and the Glaze for $4 at my local Walmart or walmart.com and lasts for multiple props and helmets. That's a pretty good deal.

I thought I did mention this was pretty much the same as any autoleveling product technique, like primer filler. The difference is instead of 1-3 coats you can do 3-6 coats. The benefit to more, thinner coats is that you get to control the process. You get to catch the details before you lose them and for rattle cans they are suprising easy to sand.

But, there is no one method for anything and I encourage you to keep trying more and post your findings.
 

NobleTravis

Member
I'm sorry to hear it didn't work better for you, but I appreciate the feedback.

The prices must be a regional thing. I can get the Chalky for $6 and the Glaze for $4 at my local Walmart or walmart.com and lasts for multiple props and helmets. That's a pretty good deal.

I thought I did mention this was pretty much the same as any autoleveling product technique, like primer filler. The difference is instead of 1-3 coats you can do 3-6 coats. The benefit to more, thinner coats is that you get to control the process. You get to catch the details before you lose them and for rattle cans they are suprising easy to sand.

But, there is no one method for anything and I encourage you to keep trying more and post your findings.
I’m always down to try new methods. I’ve been 3D printing for almost 5 years. So I’ve gone down the list of “removing layer line” techniques.

You might be right about the price. I was a bit turned off by how much the two cans cost here in Ohio.
 

ajmadison

New Member
I'm sorry to hear it didn't work better for you, but I appreciate the feedback.

The prices must be a regional thing. I can get the Chalky for $6 and the Glaze for $4 at my local Walmart or walmart.com and lasts for multiple props and helmets. That's a pretty good deal.

I thought I did mention this was pretty much the same as any autoleveling product technique, like primer filler. The difference is instead of 1-3 coats you can do 3-6 coats. The benefit to more, thinner coats is that you get to control the process. You get to catch the details before you lose them and for rattle cans they are suprising easy to sand.

But, there is no one method for anything and I encourage you to keep trying more and post your findings.
Frankly, Michaels is not known for its discounting on main stream supplies. So I get the fake flowers *wink* and the Liquitex gloss medium and go elsewhere for everything else.
 

ajmadison

New Member
Frankly, Michaels is not known for its discounting on main stream supplies. So I get the fake flowers *wink* and the Liquitex gloss medium and go elsewhere for everything else.
For those of you who have a Lowe's nearby, I found the Krylon Chalky and Triple Glaze together for USD $12 and change including taxes (forget which was more expensive). Home Depot retails Rustoleum products, which I found a Chalk finish paint, but nothing on the shelf (my goal is to find these products on short notice and in person) that was the equivalent to the Triple Glaze. YMMV.
 
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