Some questions

Discussion in 'New Recruits' started by Thane, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. Thane

    Thane New Member

    So, after doing all the foam work, I thought to myself, 'Hey let's paint it!' And I have a multitudinous amount of questions to ask you guys that occurred throughout this process.

    • How do you manage to get on even coats of plasitidip because when I spray it on it either splays in blotchy messy sprays, or completely over coats it
    • How to you get the foam to not fall apart after painting
    • How do you get the foam to not be so bendable
    • How do you paint/coat the foam in nice even sprays?
     
  2. Bullseye

    Bullseye

    Tip for spraying plastidip. Get a pot and warm up some water. DON'T boil the water just warm it up so it wont burn you and let the can sit in it for about 3-5 minutes it makes the rubber a little thinner and sprays evenly. Also light coats Don't try and do the whole thing in one spray. Might take 3-4 passes to get it all covered and smooth.

    What are you using to connect your foam? Hot glue, Contact cement, Super glue and on the back side of the foam (the patterned side) did you rough it up with sand paper or a dremel because the back side is heat sealed at the factory and glues don't like to stick to it unless that seal is broken.

    I have seen some people use a product called Smooth cast on the inside of foam pieces to harden them up. (Just seen posts don't really have a process for it)

    as for paint same as the plasti dip if its cold where you are (under 55 degrees F) warm up the paint and thin layers (primer first Filler primer preferred) once set then your main color again light coats multiple passes.

    I'm not an expert at Foam but i have watched ALOT of how to's of foam building check out Punished Props on you tube along with Evil Ted they do alot of how to's on foam.

    Hope this helps and good luck.
     
  3. FlyinPhil

    FlyinPhil Marketplace Supervisor Division Staff

    • How do you manage to get on even coats of plasitidip because when I spray it on it either splays in blotchy messy sprays, or completely over coats it
    I've had issues with some cans of plasti dip just being like that, and have returned some to the store on occasion if it was too hard to deal with. I would take the recommendation bullseye made about putting it in warm water. But be very careful, don't put it in hot water... It's a pressurized can, and you definitely don't want to overheat it.
    • How to you get the foam to not fall apart after painting
    I'm not really sure what to say to this one. I've never had issues with my foam parts falling apart. I always use at least one layer of floor mat foam for the base structure of my parts (usually about 12-14mm), then I layer up detail with 6mm and 2mm craft foam. Do you have any pictures so that we can help you out?
    • How do you get the foam to not be so bendable
    Foam is bendable. That's one of the great things about it, as it flexes with you when you move. Hardening it kind of defeats it's purpose. Are you having issues with your parts being kind of floppy? And if so, what thickness of foam did you use to build your suit? If you only used thin craft foam, it won't be sturdy enough, and I would go back and add floor mats to the inside of your parts to make them sturdier before painting.
    • How do you paint/coat the foam in nice even sprays?
    Practice! Spray in even lines going across the part, always moving the paint can. Start your spray before the stream of paint can even touch the part, and stop the spray after the stream of paint has left the opposite side of the part.
     
  4. TurboCharizard

    TurboCharizard

    Blotches might also be a procedure issue and not just the can being not warmed up. When you start/stop spraying you don't want to be above the piece, you want to be past onto your dropsheet/newspaper/whatevers so that you're getting PlastiDip the whole time and not old goop that's been trapped in the nozzle, accelerant only or other stuff that'll cause you grief. Even if you hold the can upside down and spray to clean the nozzle after each use, just assume there's gunk in there that'll give you a bad time when you pick up that rattle can again.

    Are you using EPS or XPS foam? This sounds like an aerosol eating polystyrene type question because I've never had an issue with EVA falling apart. If that's the case, precoat with a non-aerosol brush on acrylic gesso or PVA coat so that there's a layer to protect the foam.

    If it's not EPS or XPS you're using... What glue and paint are you using that's eating one another?
    Building in layers and shapes that support each other. I have two techniques that I use fairly regularly, one is backed in science and construction, one is cheat-y and I only use it for very thin pieces that overhang.

    For structural pieces look to ship building and the concept of ribs and stringers. Add in cross members to strengthen against rotation and flex.

    For overhang I use sheet aluminum cut into strips layered between the main foam and a sheet of 2mm foam. This can be bent and will hold it's shape as well as pull the foam into that shape if the curve you need is beyond what heat forming will keep.
    Heat seal, thin coat of PlastiDip/FlexiDip, three more coats of rubber coat, primer coat, two or three colour coats. All of them have wait times in between that are laid out on the can instructions. Patience is usually the trick to a good paint job.
     

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