Spartan Ii's Armour Progress...

SPARTAN II

Sr Member
After I don't know how many months now, I finally was able to get a few pics of my WIP Mk VI Helmet uploaded to my computer. The cause for the delay was that, well... my digital camera is USB2 whereas my 5-year-old piece o' junk computer is only USB1 compatible, and I have yet to get a USB adapter.



So, whatever pics I have been taking with my camera I then had to upload to a friend's computer and then transfer them from there to my computer. A serious pain in the posterior, let me tell ya.



I'd actually posted these four pics in my profile gallery, but due to some issues with not getting the link URL's to work from the hosting site I'm using (Imageshack.us), not until today was I able to post them here in a thread format.



Anyway, without further adieu, here are a few pics to show the current stage of construction on my Mk VI Helmet:



Mk VI Helmet -- Pic 01 (Front view)



Mk VI Helmet -- Pic 02 (Top view)



Mk VI Helmet -- Pic 03 (Nosepiece construction)



Mk VI Helmet -- Pic 04 (Side view)



For those who aren't aware, I decided to go the route of building my helmet entirely out of layered sheet styrene (the thickest I could find was .080; it builds up rather sturdy once you have a bunch of it together), using the Pepakura paper model as a base.



As can be seen in the pics, I've incorporated a little of the HALO 2 version into the design (ie. thin rectangular protrusions on the side of the LED housing) which, although are present on the Legendary helmet, are not representative of the in-game HALO 3 model. I also decided to take a little artistic liberty and mixed some of the in-game model HALO 3 details with some seen on the "Starry Night" model.



I've cut out all vent areas on the sides and top, and plan on putting in two small exhaust fans in the LED housings. Both the LEDs and fans will be operated by two switches built into the design (the small rectangular openings); one will turn on the LEDs, the other will turn on the exhaust fans. The power supply will be situated in the back of the helmet, in the curved "band" area.



The forward vents near the nosepiece will simply be left open with a rounded, ribbed frame covering them comprised of wire loom (I got that idea from another member here) and the top vents have openings to allow for more air circulation.



I wanted to make as many vents functional as possible, as that will help to keep things cool in there when wearing it. The top and front-side vents will not have exhaust fans behind them, but it is my belief that just by having those areas open the two exhaust fans that will be installed will do enough to move the air around.



For the nosepiece, I've already built in the recessed area and will scratch-build the multi-piece assembly that goes just up in front of the visor as it appears on the Legendary helmet. That part will consist of four segments which will then be glued together and inserted in that recessed area.



Also, I've started marking off where some of the details (ie. raised/recessed areas) should be, and I think I even found one or two details seen on the in-game model but not added to any other helmet build thus far, such as the two raised details on the brim of the helmet just forward of the vents.



Well, I think that about covers it for now, LOL. Questions? Comments? All are welcome... :)/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' /> " border="0" alt="smile.gif" />
 

Vexona

Well-Known Member
These pics were worth the wait :) Very nice work!

So there will be 2 tiny exhaust fans where the led's are mounted? I'm just imagining how eensy and cute those will be! :p
Hopefully that coupled with the cutouts will be enough to keep you cool and your visor from fogging up :)

Can't wait to see this evolve and get painted! The smoothness of the styrene is verrrrrry classy.
 

mgrmax

Jr Member
That looks really good. I would be interested in seeing some assembly pics if you have them. Sorry if I missed it but what are you using to smooth it out?
 

SPARTAN II

Sr Member
Thanks for the compliments, guys and gal ;)

To clarify better, the exhaust fans (12V DC, measuring 40mm squared by 12mm thick) will be installed in the vent openings underneath where the two built-in switches will be. I will be scratch-building small brackets of a sort to hold them in place, rather than sloppily glue them in. That should help to keep them out of the way of the LED and switch wiring in the upper portion of the side housing.

I definately like the look of the styrene too, hence why I decided to go with that as the main material to build it out of. For one, I have a great deal of experience working with styrene and find it to be a very versatile material, and the finished product will end up with a very smooth, clean surface. Even though it still has some of that geometrical shape to it at the moment, I'm finding it very easy to sand it smooth to round out any sharp edges or angles.

Speaking of which, I am using a type of modeller's putty (Tamiya brand) to fill in any gaps and to help smooth things over during the sanding process. Although I haven't had much time to devote to it since late last year (early November, I think?), as I'm currently collaborating with a friend from one of the Star Trek prop forums I frequent on a PADD kit intended for sale, so far I think it's coming along well.

As I do more with it I will be sure to be post pics... :cool:
 

skope

Jr Member
good work so far ... extra points for originality (at least I haven't seen others) by using styrene
 

NZTK

Well-Known Member
Looks great so far! nice work with the sheet plastic too, I've wondered why more people don't do that
 

SPARTAN II

Sr Member
Skope said:
good work so far ... extra points for originality (at least I haven't seen others) by using styrene
NZ-TK said:
Looks great so far! nice work with the sheet plastic too, I've wondered why more people don't do that
Thanks, fellas! I pride myself on doing exacting, accurate prop builds, so this project would be no exception.

I used styrene as I'm very comfortable working with that medium (have used it for all my scratch-builds), and so like working with it.

Aside from Sean Bradley, I myself don't know of anyone else here who's ever used sheet styrene as the base material for thier armour builds. It's usually the standard resin/fiberglass approach... o_O
 
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SPARTAN II

Sr Member
Coming from you, Doc, that's quite the compliment! :D

Unfortunately, I haven't gotten around to painting those awesomely done Mk VI Gauntlets you sent me, my friend.

What with the cold weather, I can't do any priming/painting outdoors, and as my roommates don't like me doing such work inside during the winter because it stinks up the place, I simply have to wait until spring to do any of that sort of work on them, or my helmet.

Besides, as I'd mentioned above I'm currently engrossed in a collaborative kit project with one of my Star Trek prop buddies for a rare type of PADD, so that's kinda preoccupying most of my free time at the moment.

It takes a lot of research (reference pics, etc.), determining where to procure the proper materials, figuring a cost estimate for each kit and what not to get a project of this sort off the ground, so he and I are really having to commit our time to it.

However, that doesn't mean I couldn't take a few minutes to prep my helmet and gauntlets for priming/painting. And, of course, I could do more detail work on the helmet while waiting on warmer weather to come around so I can actually paint both...
 

Sean Bradley

Sr Member
I'm VERY happy to see someone finally take my advice and build their armor with sheet styrene! It is such a better material to work with than cardstock..

Excellent work on this, hopefully others will get the message.

(y)
 

SPARTAN II

Sr Member
Thanks for the encouragement, Sean! Much appreciated! Maybe we'll end up starting a trend with styrene builds instead of cardstock, heh heh...
 

SPARTAN II

Sr Member
Well, aside from the on-going job search, it looks like I will probably have some time now to work on this again as the PADD kit I was collaborating on has been put on hold (my friend is up to his neck in film production work at the moment).

However, now that I have some free time for this, I'm debating on whether or not to continue with this particular helmet.

See, I've been looking at it recently and only now realized there are a few glaring flaws in its construction. In fact, some of those flaws can be seen in the few pics I posted at the beginning of this thread.

FLAW # 1 (Pic 01): The crown of the helmet isn't uniform/symmetrical. If you take a close look, you'll see that it juts out on the right-hand side;

FLAW # 2 (Pic 02): The top vents don't extend as far back as they should;

FLAW # 3 (Pic 02): The recessed middle portion of the brim of the helmet isn't square, it angles forward a bit to the left-hand side;

On top of all that, I realized there could be some difficulty in trying to incorporate some of the smaller details, like the small indentations on top of the "band" at the back, for example (Pic 04).

Perhaps I'm just being a wee bit too nit-picky of my own work, but having been at this sort of thing for the last seven years thereabouts I take great pride in getting my scratch-builds done to exacting standards, and so tend to be my very own worst critic.

For someone like me, with those sort of self-imposed high standards, inaccurate work like this simply won't do. I want this to be perfect.

I was thinking maybe I should start over, using one of Flying Squirrel's more detailed helmet .pdo files. Of course, I'll still be using styrene as the base material.

At the same time, though, I know how much time and effort I've already put into this, and everyone else I know who's seen my work on this seems to think I've done a really good job on it. So, that fact alone gives me pause. Am I simply being too anal about this, and should be happy with what I've done so far, LOL?

Therefore, I throw the question out to those who have been following along with this: should I continue working on this one, or should I actually start a new build based on Flying Squirrel's helmet to make it as detailed as I can?
 

23Magnum

Well-Known Member
SPARTAN II said:
For someone like me, with those sort of self-imposed high standards, inaccurate work like this simply won't do. I want this to be perfect.

I was thinking maybe I should start over, using one of Flying Squirrel's more detailed helmet .pdo files. Of course, I'll still be using styrene as the base material.

At the same time, though, I know how much time and effort I've already put into this, and everyone else I know who's seen my work on this seems to think I've done a really good job on it. So, that fact alone gives me pause.

Therefore, I throw the question out to those who have been following along with this: should I continue working on this one, or should I actually start a new build based on Flying Squirrel's helmet to make it as detailed as I can? Am I simply being too anal about this, LOL? o_O
The price of being a perfectionist. I'm the same way, though no one's seen any work from me yet because I'm also a horrible procrastinator, haha.

I don't know, but for me, it'd probably come down to how much the materials are costing me to see if starting over would be cheaper or just fixing what I've got. I'd also see which would be easier in my opinion. The nice thing about working with 3D Solids as I do, is that the only thing I loose when starting over is the time I spent working on the old model(s). In physical reality, this is extremely different of course.

That probably doesn't make your decision any better though, does it?

-Magnum
 
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Walter Spase

Well-Known Member
Here is my take on it... I would say move forward... from reading your opinion on your own work.. you have done a fairly acceptable job so far with only a few minor glitches... try fixing some of those and move forward. Complete the sets of armor that are not 100% accurate or 100% symetrical, but while they look great is reason enough to just move forward with your build. Why go back to create the "perfect helmet". Its ultimately what you are happy with. If your unhappy, start over. But what do you want to do.

Plus, a "perfect" helmet wont exist, but there will always be alot of "almost perfect" ones.

Take it this way..... go out in a full suit thats 85% accurate but constructed/painted well, and then stand next to someone with a 100% correct helmet while they wear jeans and a t-shirt. Who is going to draw more attention. None of us have 100% correct suits, but everyone with a complete suit, loves it all the same.
 

Skullcandy Girl

Well-Known Member
I agree with Spase. I think you've done a bang up job! And ultimately it does come down to what you want to do. Whatever you do I'm sure it'll look great :)

sidenotes: Aside from asking for critiques and minus your view of your work, if someone takes a magnifying glass to your armor and points out "how wrong" it is, they're being a buttface and they may need to be exposed to some sunlight instead of staring at MC's game model :p.
 

docbytes

Well-Known Member
Skullcandy Girl said:
I agree with Spase. I think you've done a bang up job! And ultimately it does come down to what you want to do. Whatever you do I'm sure it'll look great :)

Listen to SC and Spase they are very right. Your work so far ROCKS!

SC you need to take your own advice ;) You helm rocks too!
 
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SPARTAN II

Sr Member
Hmm... you all do have a point, there.

Even being the perfectionist I am when it comes to prop building, it's true there will never be such a thing as the "perfect" helmet. "Almost perfect", but not "perfect".

That, I guess, comes from each person's interpretation of it, and just what he/she feels like adding to it to make it what they think the Master Chief's helmet and armour looks like.

Even with all the reference material out there, it's a given everyone will employ thier own artistic license to some aspects of the design.

There's no reason why mine would be any different.

Another thing I hadn't really thought about was the cost of the materials used, or the cost (in terms of hours) of the labour put into it.

Though sheet styrene on its own isn't at all expensive, it's taking the time to build an entirely new helmet that's rather labour-intensive.

As you all obviously think I've done a good job on this one, it may be unnecessary for me to redo all of it, and would then just be making a whole lot of unnecessary work for myself, LOL.

I'll have to give this some thought, and see just what I can do to correct those flaws... :whistle:
 

docbytes

Well-Known Member
SPARTAN II said:
Hmm... you all do have a point, there.

Even being the perfectionist I am when it comes to prop building, it's true there will never be such a thing as the "perfect" helmet. "Almost perfect", but not "perfect".
(y) I almost gave up because I thought mine looked horrible, but the more and more you do the better it becomes visually and your mind set starts to change. Besides if we all had the same look to our armor we'd be stormtroopers!


no offense I like them too.
 
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