Using resin in cold weather

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Ari

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Hi guys, I'm looking for a bit of advice as I'm working on fiberglassing my pep suit. It's gotten a bit chilly in good ol' Canada. Nothing special but definitely far below the recommended temperatures for resin, like 0-5 degrees Celsius or 32-41 Fahrenheit. The resin is still quite tacky even after curing for several hours or overnight. I've read about making sure the resin and hardener are thoroughly mixed and made sure I was doing so which didn't help. I'm also weary of adding more hardener after hearing about how it can make the finished product more brittle.

Does anybody have any suggestions I might try? Letting them cure inside isn't much of an option as I can't have fumes floating all over. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.
 

preskewl

Member
Ari said:
Hi guys, I'm looking for a bit of advice as I'm working on fiberglassing my pep suit. It's gotten a bit chilly in good ol' Canada. Nothing special but definitely far below the recommended temperatures for resin, like 0-5 degrees Celsius or 32-41 Fahrenheit. The resin is still quite tacky even after curing for several hours or overnight. I've read about making sure the resin and hardener are thoroughly mixed and made sure I was doing so which didn't help. I'm also weary of adding more hardener after hearing about how it can make the finished product more brittle.

Does anybody have any suggestions I might try? Letting them cure inside isn't much of an option as I can't have fumes floating all over. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.


Heatgun!! It's your bestfriend... I made the investment, I can tell you it saved me alot of time in waiting for the resin to cure.. You will need to constantly move the heatgun around and not make the resin crack.. Also, if you do have little tacky area's.. From what I learned from link on other stickies.. Babypowder will work.. Spread it around the area....
 
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