Windows 64

Pack hunter

Jr Member
hey guys I'm doing some heavy computer upgrades and junk and it turns out in order to run some of the programs i need not only for school but for later job opps I need to go to windows 64 (thats mostly because of the ram and/or memory i need to run them which is around 16gigs) and i don't know alot of people who run it or even better if there is anything i need to do to the files i have on my windows 32 harddrives for when i do make the upgrades

basically all i'm gonna have from my orginial rig are the harddrives and my moniter...i manged to get my hands on an 8-core processor clock at 3.15, which is like.... 25.2 and a GeForce 550 GTX card... i'm not too sure how to tell the motherboards apart very well, which is sad since i work and play around computers anywhere from 12 to 16 hrs a day...the rest is sleep
 

p bro

Jr Member
What are you asking mate? I have 64bit Windows 7 and everything runs fine, it's preferable that you use 64bit versions of programs (especially with utilities like graphics drivers) but I have plenty of 32bit programs installed that seem to work as well.
Once you install your new OS your harddrives will still work without any modification, however you will need to back up your data if you plan to format one of the partitions to install Windows 7.

If you need a new motherboard, look up your CPU model online to find out it's socket type (it should a letter and number combination like - "LGA1155") and then look up models of motherboards that support the socket type of your CPU.

Do you know anyone in real life who knows about building computers and could help you? The best way to learn is from them.
 

Finelargeaxe

Jr Member
hey guys I'm doing some heavy computer upgrades and junk and it turns out in order to run some of the programs i need not only for school but for later job opps I need to go to windows 64 (thats mostly because of the ram and/or memory i need to run them which is around 16gigs) and i don't know alot of people who run it or even better if there is anything i need to do to the files i have on my windows 32 harddrives for when i do make the upgrades

basically all i'm gonna have from my orginial rig are the harddrives and my moniter...i manged to get my hands on an 8-core processor clock at 3.15, which is like.... 25.2 and a GeForce 550 GTX card... i'm not too sure how to tell the motherboards apart very well, which is sad since i work and play around computers anywhere from 12 to 16 hrs a day...the rest is sleep
You WILL want to back up your documents and game saves and whatnot...that's just good system building practice. You will need to fully reinstall any games or programs, though: you run a real risk of serious registry errors if you just try to copy/paste them to the new OS.
32-bit programs will work under 64-bit operating systems, but 64-bit programs will not work under 32-bit operating systems. The main difference between x32 and x64 is that x64 can access more than ~3.5GB RAM (which seems to be the limit for x32 systems.
What are you asking mate? I have 64bit Windows 7 and everything runs fine, it's preferable that you use 64bit versions of programs (especially with utilities like graphics drivers) but I have plenty of 32bit programs installed that seem to work as well.
Once you install your new OS your harddrives will still work without any modification, however you will need to back up your data if you plan to format one of the partitions to install Windows 7.

If you need a new motherboard, look up your CPU model online to find out it's socket type (it should a letter and number combination like - "LGA1155") and then look up models of motherboards that support the socket type of your CPU.

Do you know anyone in real life who knows about building computers and could help you? The best way to learn is from them.
As he mentioned an 8-core processor (and Intel doesn't have theirs out just yet), that's one of AMD's AM3+
socket processors. LGA1155 is the new socket for the second-gen Core i-series, right?

Pack hunter, I'd love to come out and put this thing together for you, but Iowa's a bit too far away for me. Let us know if you need any other long-distance advice.
 

p bro

Jr Member
As he mentioned an 8-core processor (and Intel doesn't have theirs out just yet), that's one of AMD's AM3+
socket processors. LGA1155 is the new socket for the second-gen Core i-series, right?
Yeah, it's for the Sandy Bridge Intel processors, I was using it as an example. I glossed over the 8 core part, good pick up.
 

Pack hunter

Jr Member
so i need to check to see if the motherboard i'm getting has those sockets, and with the video card its says it has 1gig of GDDR3 does it matter if i have just DDR3 for the system memory, which if i remember correctly system ram and video ram is a whole different thing?.... and you asked if i know any pc builders well there is my dad but he hasn't built a pc for awhile and he has never run 64 bit, i could ask my professer but he's always busy or in la-la land.....

if needed i can post the specs for ya

i've tried googling info for it but for some strange reason google keeps telling me i have them blocked er something like that said something about the network firewall/proxy
 

Katsu

Well-Known Member
System and video ram are seperate, so don't worry about the ram on the video card, just make sure you get the right ram for the mobo.

Also 1gig of video ram is pretty low, but it all depends on your wallet... new cards have 3gb. You can find some mid range cards with 2gb for around 200$.

A great thing about 64bit windows 7 is it has spots for 32bit and 64bit software, so you don't really need to worry too much, unless you're using windows 98 right now... in which case any old programs won't work for you, but it's unlikely anyone has anything older than xp as their main computer.
 

kimmike120

New Member
Windows Vista contains hundreds of new features. Some of the most significant ones are the updated graphical user interface and visual style named Windows Aero, the improved searching features, new multimedia creation tools such as Windows DVD Maker, and completely redesigned networking technology, as well as audio, print, and display sub-systems.
 
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