Halo 3 Fully 3D Printed Build

TurboCharizard

Division PR, RMO and BCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
After some considerable time taken to plan this suit I have finally started the printing process. This suit will be entirely printed with PLA then padded, painted and have LEDs installed. I plan to make this suit as game accurate as possible. Standby for updates!
What armour variant are you going with? The standard Mark VI?
 

ponti dude

New Member
hey guys im trying to do the same thing but am having trouble with the files i have. the files i want to use are pepakura files and need to be converted to obj to do this, but to do that you need a paid version of pepakura. just wondering if anyone would be able to convert them for me or knows a way to convert them without buying pepakura.
thanks:)
 

SI3RRA 117

Well-Known Member
Ahhhh the world of 3d printing. I would first try reslicing the model maybe a goose error? Then go from there. Can you command the y axis to move properly with the control board? First few print shows came out nice!
 

TurboCharizard

Division PR, RMO and BCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Can you command the y axis to move properly with the control board? First few print shows came out nice!
This is the correct answer for troubleshooting mechanical issues. Try to command one axis at a time locally from the controller. If that doesn't yield a result, unplug the other axis stepper motor that is functional and plug the cable into the failing motor to see if it's an issue with the motor itself or the on-board stepper driver. If plugging into the problem motor and controlling (in this case X because you're testing Y) the opposite motor gets you motion, it's likely a stepper driver, if you don't get the expected motion you likely have a motor that's dead. Luckily both are cheap fixes.

I've had motors that have failed before and you can change out the internal bearings if you're careful, if you don't trust your mechanical skill, $10-$15 for a new NEMA17 motor isn't going to break the bank. Also a hot swap with a fresh motor means you have an old dead one that you can tinker around with and maybe integrate into another prop or costume later :D
 

lilyleopard

New Member
hey guys im trying to do the same thing but am having trouble with the files i have. the files i want to use are pepakura files and need to be converted to obj to do this, but to do that you need a paid version of pepakura. just wondering if anyone would be able to convert them for me or knows a way to convert them without buying pepakura.
thanks:)
If you search for 3d modeling threads, you can find some free files to use. Here is a good thread to start with.
 

Wildskij

New Member
So new motor is in however, I didn't account for the wiring to be different... Does anyone know what the proper wiring arrangement is from the stock CR10S5 connector to a standard red, black, blue, green connector is?
 

TurboCharizard

Division PR, RMO and BCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
So new motor is in however, I didn't account for the wiring to be different... Does anyone know what the proper wiring arrangement is from the stock CR10S5 connector to a standard red, black, blue, green connector is?
As with all electronics conventions are just a suggestion and following your rules to the letter may leave you scratching your head. If you have the pairings of wires correct you'll get motion in either the CW or CCW direction when connected to the controller.
268759

When I replaced a motor on my Tevo Tornado recently a pair of wires was reversed from the stepper driver so the expected rotation direction was opposite. A quick swap of the two wires and everything was good as new.
 

GrandMoffJimbob

New Member
I've had motors that have failed before and you can change out the internal bearings if you're careful, if you don't trust your mechanical skill, $10-$15 for a new NEMA17 motor isn't going to break the bank. Also a hot swap with a fresh motor means you have an old dead one that you can tinker around with and maybe integrate into another prop or costume later :D
Because tinkering with things and repurposing said things is awesome!
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
As with all electronics conventions are just a suggestion
I just want to clear this up a little bit for people who aren't familiar with electronics and find this thread later. This is not the case for all electric conventions, but more of a happenstance that works in the case of motors since they operate regardless of which direction current is flowing. For example, it is a convention that the longer leg on an LED is positive, and the shorter negative. Sure, you could ignore this and shorten the long-leg to be shorter than the short leg (for whatever reason), but you can't change which side is positive and negative like you can on a motor. If you plug that thing in backwards, you'll likely be buying a new LED unless you're quick to remove it. A lot of conventions are there for a reason, and sometimes just to make your life easier. Unfortunately, not everyone follows the same conventions, so sometimes you run into the case of something like motors where plugging it it one way may give one result, while doing the same thing on another product gives the opposite.
 
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Phauxelate

Active Member
How did you slice up your pieces? When I sliced mine up, I had to split the 3D model in order for it to fit onto the bed, and it left me scratching my head of the best way to go about doing that. No over-hang, and having it completely flat is weird figuring out
 

GrandMoffJimbob

New Member
I just want to clear this up a little bit for people who aren't familiar with electronics and find this thread later. This is not the case for all electric conventions, but more of a happenstance that works in the case of motors since they operate regardless of which direction current is flowing. For example, it is a convention that the longer leg on an LED is positive, and the shorter negative. Sure, you could ignore this and shorten the long-leg to be shorter than the short leg (for whatever reason), but you can't change which side is positive and negative like you can on a motor. If you plug that thing in backwards, you'll likely be buying a new LED unless you're quick to remove it. A lot of conventions are there for a reason, and sometimes just to make your life easier. Unfortunately, not everyone follows the same conventions, so sometimes you run into the case of something like motors where plugging it it one way may give one result, while doing the same thing on another product gives the opposite.
And for some reason some LEDs are reversed
 

GrandMoffJimbob

New Member
How did you slice up your pieces? When I sliced mine up, I had to split the 3D model in order for it to fit onto the bed, and it left me scratching my head of the best way to go about doing that. No over-hang, and having it completely flat is weird figuring out
I did it to where the pieces were gonna be the most stable, or where details would show up best. Theres practically no way around no overhangs, just add some supports.
 

TurboCharizard

Division PR, RMO and BCO
Division Staff
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
I just want to clear this up a little bit for people who aren't familiar with electronics and find this thread later. This is not the case for all electric conventions, but more of a happenstance that works in the case of motors since they operate regardless of which direction current is flowing. For example, it is a convention that the longer leg on an LED is positive, and the shorter negative. Sure, you could ignore this and shorten the long-leg to be shorter than the short leg (for whatever reason), but you can't change which side is positive and negative like you can on a motor. If you plug that thing in backwards, you'll likely be buying a new LED unless you're quick to remove it. A lot of conventions are there for a reason, and sometimes just to make your life easier. Unfortunately, not everyone follows the same conventions, so sometimes you run into the case of something like motors where plugging it it one way may give one result, while doing the same thing on another product gives the opposite.
If you ever start disassembling consumer electronics from Chinese manufacturers you sometimes start to notice some oddities. I live by the Cardcaptors mantra of "expect the unexpected now", especially when it comes to proper wiring colouring, connectors or materials choices.
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
If you ever start disassembling consumer electronics from Chinese manufacturers you sometimes start to notice some oddities. I live by the Cardcaptors mantra of "expect the unexpected now", especially when it comes to proper wiring colouring coloring, connectors or materials choices.
Ah, your post makes more sense now, they do some weird stuff. My main concern was someone accidentally frying something because they flipped it around. In that type of situation, western conventions are probably of little help.
 

Phauxelate

Active Member
If you ever start disassembling consumer electronics from Chinese manufacturers you sometimes start to notice some oddities. I live by the Cardcaptors mantra of "expect the unexpected now", especially when it comes to proper wiring colouring, connectors or materials choices.

I work for a company that does electrical work for waterslides, and there have been stories where people go on site to slides in China. All, and I mean all of the wiring for some slides are a single color and unlabeled. It's a whole thing apparently
 
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