Paint Booth Tutorial

darkesword2020

Well-Known Member
booth_8.jpg


My instructions on how to build a spray booth for around $40.00 (pricing is approximate, your actual cost may vary)

Approximate costs:

Storage tub:$10, dryer vent kit: $10, AC fan: $20.



Materials & tools:

Plastic storage tub (as large or small as your typical project), clothes dryer vent kit (typically 4"), 4" AC powered fan (preferably brushless), air conditioner filter foam, AC cord (built in switch if possible), cardboard, screws (machine or wood, or nut/bolt sets), pen, utility knife, screwdriver.

Photos are of the completed project, but construction is fairly straight forward.

booth_2.jpg


Up-end your tub so you're looking into it horizontally. Mark a 4 inch circle wherever is convenient for your work area layout. Cut the hole with the utility knife. Place the fan over the hole inside the tub and mark the locations for the mounting screws. Likewise, take the dryer fitting of the vent kit and mark the location of its mounting holes. If you're lucky, both sets of holes will be the same.

booth_3.jpg


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Route the AC cord through the hole (or make a separate hole) and attach it to the fan. Cut a piece of air conditioner filter foam and mount it over the fan. Depending on the style fan you have, you may have to make a cardboard spacer to make sure it clears the movement of the fan blade. I hadn't attached the foam as of this pic.

booth_5.jpg


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Make a cardboard insert a little smaller than the size of your open window. Mark and cut out a 4 inch circle on it. Attach the house fitting from the vent kit to cardboard. Attach the hose to both fittings - window insert and spray booth.

booth_1.jpg


I keep the cover of the booth handy. After I spray a part, I put the cover on the tub. That keeps any remaining overspray inside the tub and speeds the drying and venting processes a bit. When the tub gets too coated with paint, just replace it.
 

Sean Bradley

Sr Member
Great Tutorial, make sure that you post a link to it in the TUTORIAL LINKS thread stickied in this forum.

Keep up the good work!

-Sean
 

darkesword2020

Well-Known Member
I'd say it does. All the fumes are sent out the window, but I've updated my setup since I made this tutorial. I'm using a more powerful fan now.
 

Long Shot

Member
You did a nice job on this one but i need to warn you about something. It is very dangerous to have the fan's motor where the paint is being vented. Spray paint is highly flammable and electric motors cause sparks. By putting the motor in direct contact withe flowing electrical current you are at risk for causing a fire.
 
Depends on what paint you are using, Spray paint isn't VERY flammable I'd say, this coming from someone who lights it on fire every once in a while. In order for it to light you literally have to have an open flame in the stream so I do not think that the tiny sparks in the fan motor will cause much of a problem. Then again I am not an expert on these things and I could very easily be wrong.
 

Long Shot

Member
Depends on what paint you are using, Spray paint isn't VERY flammable I'd say, this coming from someone who lights it on fire every once in a while. In order for it to light you literally have to have an open flame in the stream so I do not think that the tiny sparks in the fan motor will cause much of a problem. Then again I am not an expert on these things and I could very easily be wrong.
Regardless spraypaint is still flammable and in the mass quantity that is used when spraying an object it is very dangerous. What you see when you light it on fire is a controled burn, If you're spraying something and it catches on fire that's an explosive burn and it will injure you
 
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