armor on hold

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death

Member
Not a HUGE pause, but enough to make me angry. Just felt i needed to tell someone to get it off my back, even if i don't know why. I'm 15 and jobless which makes this really annoying at times. Being almost Christmas, my dad was able to bring me to Home Depot and get me some fiberglass mat and all purpose resin, BUT he didn't have another $30 for the respirator. So i have everything but the part that keeps me from dying!!! :mad: :mad: :mad: Don't say I'm complaining because I'm not, just felt like i needed to shout that out. Has anyone ever had the same issue?
 

S1l3nt V1p3r

Sr Member
If you don't have a respirator, you could just resin one part at a time. Preferably in a garage.
And takes brakes often, you don't want to breathe in fumes all the time, would you?
 

Razgriz

Well-Known Member
Don't worry. Ive been fiber glassing for a few yeas now (On other projects besides my armor) and I've never worn a respirator. Mainly because you're not working with large amounts at a time.
 

tsau mia

Member
I know you guys are young, but you need to know that the box of resin has a warning on it for a reason. It also says that it causes cancer, and that is known by scientists in California. You say you've been fiberglassing for a few years, or half a helmet, but symptoms, (or death) doesn't show up for like thirty years. You die early. That's what it does. It gets in your system and ages it.
Don't tell people not to wear one. There's warnings on the box for a reason. And you DO need one.
 

death

Member
Heh, saw that pep talk coming after i read the posts saying you don't need one. I wouldn't think of resining without one. If you hadn't said it, tsau-mia, i would have.
 

helios

Member
Yes, look after the little kiddies. Resin is dangerous, thats why I use cardboard. It won't look as good, last as long, or stand up to as much of a battering, but its cheap, and I can do it inside :D
 

NZTK

Well-Known Member
just do it outside if you can, resperators are designed for people doing large amounts of glassing, like auto repair or making a boat, they usually work in enclosed temperature and humidity controlled environments, if you are outside you'll have plenty of ventilation, having said that, yes resin is dangerous. I personally dont think young kids should use it at all. If you're old enough to decide if you want to risk your health by smoking a cigarette, then you're old enough to make the same choices with regards to other harmful substances (ie organic peroxide). If not, get a grown up to help you, or wrap yourself in cotton wool, stay in bed and attempt nothing, cause there are potentially dangerous things everywhere.
 

tsau mia

Member
Since this thread got a little off-topic, I'm going to steer it back on. Since you shouldn't resin without a respirator, you can still fiberglass. Just use spray adhesive to stick it in. I used wood glue, but just something to get it to stick to the pep. Then you stick the fiberglass in, and you can spray paint over it if you are concerned about the fiberglass bits getting all over the place.
 
How many times have I got to say this? WEAR A RESPIRATOR! DUSTS MASKS DO NOT WORK! RESIN GIVES YOU CANCER! YOU GET NERVOUS SYSTEM DAMAGE FROM IT. KID OR NOT YOU NEED TO KNOW THAT YOU SHOULDNT GIVE OUT BULLCRAP INFORMATION ABOUT HOW TO USE THE STUFF.
 
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NZTK

Well-Known Member
you can still fiberglass
I'd dissagree with that, its the glass fibres that you really need to watch out for, painting a coat of resin outside is (in my VERY unpopular opinion) fine, but you really dont want to mess about with glass particulates, sanding them and breathing the dust will destroy your lungs pretty quick, also while working with glass you want to get some dishwashing gloves and and old long sleeve shirt (which you'll probably be throwing away), or the glass fibres get into your skin on your hands and forearms and itch like mad, you can get purpose made jumpsuits with hoods though.
 
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Razgriz

Well-Known Member
NZ-TK said:
I'd dissagree with that, its the glass fibres that you really need to watch out for, painting a coat of resin outside is (in my VERY unpopular opinion) fine, but you really dont want to mess about with glass particulates, sanding them and breathing the dust will destroy your lungs pretty quick, also while working with glass you want to get some dishwashing gloves and and old long sleeve shirt (which you'll probably be throwing away), or the glass fibres get into your skin on your hands and forearms and itch like mad, you can get purpose made jumpsuits with hoods though.

I don't wear a respirator when resining because I do it on the edge of my garage wear I always have a nice breeze. However, I know that fibereglass can be nasty. ALWAYS wear something when working with fiberglass cloth. My first time I wore mouth protection but wore short sleeves. Bad mistake, that stuff itches and sticks in your skin, for a LONG time.

It's up to you. My grandpa lived next to like, six different boat making companies (They used fiberglass) almost all of his life until he moved and he's eighty five and as healthy as a horse.
 
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death

Member
First of all, your grandfather was lucky. Either the fumes dissipated before they reached his house, or he somehow didn't inhale them. Also, resining next to a door with a breeze is not a replacement for a respirator. If you can smell the resin, it's effecting you. Sometimes even if you can't smell it. As for using fiberglass without resin as you said tsau, i disagree. The point of using fiberglass WITH resin is that they bond and make it much harder than just resin or fiberglass alone. Just gluing on fiberglass and spraying with adhesive will not be as strong as properly resining and fiberglassing. I learned this first hand from a teacher that has been fiberglassing and painting boats all his life.
 

tsau mia

Member
I'm sorry, you're right. I just meant that you could get the fiberglass in there until you could resin it. Just so that you could get that part done. And yes, it itches like mad. I used gloves and an old shirt, and I took my gloves off before my shirt, and I still go the little buggers stuck under my skin. It's no fun.
I'm also assuming you'll do the fiberglass the right way, and just use a particle filter and safety goggles.

Sorry for the misunderstanding.
 

death

Member
No problem, and you are right. It would be a good idea to get that part done even if i don't have my respirator yet. Also, do you think i could get 2 layers of fiberglass on the inside of the helmet with 3 square feet of fiberglass mat? And how many layers are suggested for the armor?
 

tsau mia

Member
Well, it depends on how you plan to use it. I've heard of people adding as many as 5-7 layers of fiberglass for the crotch piece, in the butt area, because it has to hold your weight when you're sitting in it. My helmet seems very sturdy, and I only put 1 layer in, but overlapped where I thought it might need more support. It seems to be doing just fine, but I suggest keeping an eye on your fiberglass while it dries so that it doesn't create bubbles all over the place. It also makes the helmet smaller too, which is bad when you're trying to size it just right.
 

jimmyfu

Jr Member
wait, i'm curious as to this question too. when you say a dust mask, do you mean like those SARS masks that they wore in China a while back? or would those be ok?
 

MC PwN 3R

Member
all i wore while fiberglassing was a wet cloth over my face and mouth, and eventually it fell down. i then got used to the fumes. i didnt get high off of it and i used the fiberglass cloth, which wasnt very itchy in any way. it was just annoying when the stray threads didnt stay down. otherwise, do it somewhere where it stays away from flame, and somewhere well ventilated....otherwise use a respirator if you are still worried and want to be on the safe side.
 
jimmyfu said:
wait, i'm curious as to this question too. when you say a dust mask, do you mean like those SARS masks that they wore in China a while back? or would those be ok?


A dust mask blocks out, hence the name "DUST Mask" Wear a respirator.
 
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death

Member
Well, i finally got to Home Depot and got a respirator. I am planning to do this in the unfinished part of my basement. It is still heated, so the resin should be fine. I'll open the 2 windows that are in there too for ventilation, and stick an electric heater in there too just in case it gets too cold with the windows open. Now, before i start, can anyone tell me how much resin i should need to completely coat the outside of the helmet? I don't want to mix too much and waste it.
 
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