Can I buy an ODST full set of armor? And if so for how much?

Phauxelate

Active Member
They do have decent prices, I thought you said Home Depot before and then I went back and read you initial reply. My apologies. I think it can be done for about $200 in foam and maybe another $100-$150 in sealant, and paint supplies.
No problem my dude! I'm not upset here, so don't worry. Just having a friendly discussion :)
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
I was looking to 3d printing services online, to see what it would cost to have a professional print me a suit. There's a company that also prints in titanium, out of curiousity I wanted to know how much the halo infinite armor would cost. The answer? $500,000.
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
You should look into the HD foam from SKS Props. I’ve used it, not only can you get a big roll for cheap it’s some of the best performing stuff out there.

I 3D Print and of someone commissioned me for a full con ready ODST Kit it would run you about $2,000.
I haven't tried SKS Foam since it seems like a gray version of TNT based on other builders reviews. The high density Red Moon Cosplay Solutions stuff (90kg+ density) is awesome, I jammed a suit in my suitcase with props, clothing and everything for a week away and there's not a dent or wrinkle in the finish anywhere.

I 3D Print and of someone commissioned me for a full con ready ODST Kit it would run you about $2,000.
Materials in the $300-$500 range, print time in the several hundred machine hours, cleanup and prep is floating around 150-200 man hours. Time to boost your rates good sir.
 

Phauxelate

Active Member
They do have decent prices, I thought you said Home Depot before and then I went back and read you initial reply. My apologies. I think it can be done for about $200 in foam and maybe another $100-$150 in sealant, and paint supplies.
I don't agree with the $200 in foam, but I do agree that it could cost around that with the foam and all of the bags and accoutrements. Plus another $100 to $150 in supplies to paint and finish
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
I'm just gonna leave this here:
 

NobleTravis

Member
I haven't tried SKS Foam since it seems like a gray version of TNT based on other builders reviews. The high density Red Moon Cosplay Solutions stuff (90kg+ density) is awesome, I jammed a suit in my suitcase with props, clothing and everything for a week away and there's not a dent or wrinkle in the finish anywhere.


Materials in the $300-$500 range, print time in the several hundred machine hours, cleanup and prep is floating around 150-200 man hours. Time to boost your rates good sir.
I’ve stock piled some filament so the cost of that is pretty low. I’d turn a good profit from a full one off suit like that. The goal is to get things castable!
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
Agreed. My plan currently is to stick to props and pocket fluff style cast items for the time being because I am a proven "oddly shaped human" who doesn't work as a great one size fits most mannequin. The dream of being able to rotocast replacement parts though :love:
But if you were, the idea would make a mold from your prop and then cast a bunch of props from it (using resins, cast iron, whatever)?
 

Phauxelate

Active Member
The goal is to get things castable!
There's something I heard about 3d printing and finishing a prop, then 3d printing an inverse shell of the print that's a tad bigger to crate a jacket. Think of it as 3D printing a jacket instead of making one out of clay. Then what you'd do is pour silicon in the couple millimeter gap between the jacket and the prop you're casting, then PRESTO! You've just saved so much money on silicon!
 

NobleTravis

Member
There's something I heard about 3d printing and finishing a prop, then 3d printing an inverse shell of the print that's a tad bigger to crate a jacket. Think of it as 3D printing a jacket instead of making one out of clay. Then what you'd do is pour silicon in the couple millimeter gap between the jacket and the prop you're casting, then PRESTO! You've just saved so much money on silicon!
You can for sure print a matrix mold. I’ve looked into it.
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
There's something I heard about 3d printing and finishing a prop, then 3d printing an inverse shell of the print that's a tad bigger to crate a jacket. Think of it as 3D printing a jacket instead of making one out of clay. Then what you'd do is pour silicon in the couple millimeter gap between the jacket and the prop you're casting, then PRESTO! You've just saved so much money on silicon!
I may have been the one that tipped you off on this technique that Lumecluster uses for her Phoenix Gauntlets.
 
Top