1st Build Clear coating for cardstock


3LeggedWolf

New Member
Hello guys,

Armour spec: Papercraft method

I will be making my first suit of armour in the coming year and will hopefully have it prepared by the final year of my university degree as I'd really like to recreate the graduation marketting material Microsoft put out to hype up Reach. I really need help with a suggestion about clear coat; from what I can gather you put this on before applying aqua resin and fiberglass mat. Are we supposed to find specific coats for card, or can the ones that work for car interiors and the likes work for this?

Thank you all for any kind of response, it is appreciated.
-3LW
 

3LeggedWolf

New Member
I feel the need to add I'm following the Indy Mogul video from 12 years ago and as such is where I'm getting the basic information from as they seem to miss out a few details here and there.
 

FalseShepherd

Member
Personally, I don't clear coat my cardstock. After folding and gluing, I apply thin layers of resin to harden the paper and then fiberglass cloth for strength and resiliancy. I believe the convention is to use clear coat on top of paint.
U could try clear coating it before resin. It might harden the cardstock in a similar fashion to resin. Then the resin layers could be skipped if it gets hard enough.
 

Cadet

Executive Officer
Division Staff
Community Staff
Member DIN
S111
I have never used a Clear Coat before applying resin and fiberglass cloth/mat to my pieces. The process I have always used is to take the completed piece, with proper supports installed, and brush on a few light/thin layers of just the Fiberglass Resin on the exterior and then the interior of the piece. Then I would begin applying the Fiberglass Cloth or Mat to the interior of the piece.

Here are a few tutorials to read over to get a better idea of the process:
 

3LeggedWolf

New Member
Thank you both FalseShepard and Cadet for the responses, I'm glad this is a forum I can turn to :) I'll be looking over the tutorial section here more thoroughly to get started!
 

FalseShepherd

Member
Thank you both FalseShepard and Cadet for the responses, I'm glad this is a forum I can turn to :) I'll be looking over the tutorial section here more thoroughly to get started!
Always happy to answer questions as best we can. Also just because we don't do something, doesn't mean it's not a good idea. You could always try it on a small piece and see what happens. It might work and be amazing- you never know until you try.
 
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