EVA helmet visor perfect solution?

Lockon13

Member
So this just occurs to me. Has any one tried to cast an EVA visor, not like vacuum for the thing i mean you make a mold of just the visor and cast that with a clear resin of some kind. Any thoughts?
 

FlyinPhil

Well-Known Member
It's a good thought, but unless you have a way to maintain uniform thickness of the cast, your vision is going to be super distorted. I've seen a couple very nice looking vacuformed ones, and I'd have to say that's the best route to take.
 

Lockon13

Member
hadn't thought of that as you can tell the idea of casting is kind of a new one to me.
And i had heard that people had had a hard time vacuforming the visor?
 

GrimCitizen4

Jr Member
Wow. I am so grateful I found this post. I am working on an EVA helmet and was going to cast the visor until I found this post. Thanks, I will be Vacuforming is guess.
 

FlyinPhil

Well-Known Member
hadn't thought of that as you can tell the idea of casting is kind of a new one to me.
And i had heard that people had had a hard time vacuforming the visor?
All good man!

I'm not sure if he is on the 405th, but I'm following a guy named roshprops on instagram, and his eva helmet casts and vacuformed visors are absolutely stunning.

I don't have any personal experience with vacuforming, but I believe getting a good result is a combination of having a very precise buck, an adequately powered vacuum table, the proper material thickness, and correct temperature of the material to be formed around the buck.
 

Lockon13

Member
Well if anyone has a detailed buck or can make one and is willing to help i am working on what may be the most over-engineered vacuum table east of the Mississippi
 

Chernobyl

Sr Member
If you're skilled enough to create a system for injection or blow moulding, it's possible you could create a cast piece. Otherwise, I'd stick with vacuum forming your work - it's cheaper and there's far less to go wrong, which leads to arguably more reliable results.
 

Rosh

Member
That could be done, but the process is ultimately much more difficult than just vacuforming. I did it with a cheap homemade vac table, if you have a shop vac already you could do it for less than 200 dollars in materials. Follow the link in my signature to see the process and the results.
 

Bob Rosland

Jr Member
As long as the buck is solid you really shouldn't have any problems with vacuum forming. You can back a glassed visor with plaster and it will work just fine.
 
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