405th Cosplay Handbook

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
storm427 - In the Maintenance and the Tips/Tricks what are some kinds of things you would want to know?

And to anyone else, what are some maintenance, tips or tricks that you would want to give to new members? It can be for any method (Pep, Foam, 3d print)
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
storm427 - In the Maintenance and the Tips/Tricks what are some kinds of things you would want to know?

And to anyone else, what are some maintenance, tips or tricks that you would want to give to new members? It can be for any method (Pep, Foam, 3d print)
I think the tip ExCeLLuR8, he4thbar, and I would vouch for is reinforcing foam seams with shoe goo from behind. It can get a lil pricey, but it makes things indestructible.
 

he4thbar

Active Member
I think the tip ExCeLLuR8, he4thbar, and I would vouch for is reinforcing foam seams with shoe goo from behind. It can get a lil pricey, but it makes things indestructible.
Honestly for peace of mind that the seams won't tear, it only cost me $10-$15. I only used 2 tubes and used the 3rd one to just add more in certain areas(depends how thick you want to lay it on). I agree though shoe goo should be included.

Also I don't know if it needs to be included, but I don't see anything about painting/weathering in there which I think can be important. But I see that in your post earlier that may vary from your situation as some people can't use spray paint due to chemicals/space/climate
 

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
he4thbar AND RandomRanger I love it! While shoe goo is a very specific trick, reinforcing seems is a great general trick that I will definitely include. Another tip that seems to be the 405th Mantra is Sharp Knives! So it won't hurt to mention that one.

These are exactly what I'm looking for, KEEP THE TIPS COMING! This would be the chance to address any common mistakes people make. No neck seal? Floppy crotch pieces pieces?

Heath, you are right about the painting. I did completely overlook it. I may just mention it briefly due to space. I changed the Soft Parts to be Soft Parts & More to allow for other finishing topics like Visors and Strapping.
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
Something else that can be real helpful when trying to achieve and validate game accuracy is the point to point measuring tool included in pepakura. Using this tool allows you to make sure your cutouts, folds, bends, bevels, and etc. are all within spec (or however accurate you're going for).
Use the in-game theater mode to look at what a part is supposed to look like. The models themselves don't convey the whole story, and some 'details' in the pep files are just artifacts of technical limitations (e.g. curves appearing flat).
Disclaimer: I'm just a proxy for Excellur8's tips.
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Oh, another oddball tip that I thought of because of RandomRanger prompting with scaling.

Many of the armory files have game rip obj files which are excellent for checking surface geometry. In Fusion360 if you import an obj as a mesh you can direct measure edges and angles using the Inspect tool. Naturally the scale of the game models is on the tiny side, I've found that a scale factor of 32 gets you a 1:1 size match to Halopedia for almost all of the weapon props lengths in the Halo Reach set (sample size of six rather large props).
 

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
I dont know If this has been thought of, but a good idea may be to breifly mention how some people support and hold up armor peices...

Also an area to give formulas or examples on how to properly scale armor files? I know everyone needs this xD
 

RandomRanger

Sr Member
Also an area to give formulas or examples on how to properly scale armor files? I know everyone needs this xD
Adding on that, if Armorsmith is mentioned somewhere in there, don't use armorsmith alone as a single source of truth for scaling. Idc how accurate your body measurements are, at some point it'll cause an issue cause it's not a perfect representation. I've had a lot of luck using height-only scaling, and inter-body-part proportional scaling, though this partly only works because I'm lean. I then throw these scaled models into armorsmith as a sort of test/check before printing and building.
 

he4thbar

Active Member
Adding on that, if Armorsmith is mentioned somewhere in there, don't use armorsmith alone as a single source of truth for scaling. Idc how accurate your body measurements are, at some point it'll cause an issue cause it's not a perfect representation.
I agree, but also disagree depending on the part. My scaling went really well with everything EXCEPT my chest core. but for scaling on everything else it works out well and is the easiest to modify the parts on the fly. But I agree probably measuring your actual body measurements helps as well.
I didn't measure anything outside of my body for armorsmith though so maybe it's because i'm a lazy :notworthy:
 
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Sean Anwalt

RCO
405th Regiment Officer
Measure twice, go to write down the number, can't find a pen, forget number, measure twice, think that number can't be right, measure once, go "huh", measure again just in case. Come back weekly and perform the same series of steps and create trending data.
It's like he's speaking to/ about ME! o.0

Im sure this has been mentioned before, but a quick note on comfortable footwear and heat management.
 

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
Where do you suggest placing fans in your helmet and pointing where?
Honestly, wherever fits and has the most space, and whatever is comfortable for you. I have mine in the very top by my forehead because that has the most space in my helmet, and it can also draw air from a small gap at the top of the visor. I also have it so it blows almost all the way down my visor, hits the chin area, and redirects into my face and the rest of the helk because I didnt like it blowing directly on my face. This is different for every helmet and cosplayer
 
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