Dremel bits

Discussion in 'New Recruits' started by Lieutenant Jaku, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. What Dremel bits should I use for sanding foam smooth and nice? I got one suggestion earlier but it was only available in Canada.
     
  2. TurboCharizard

    TurboCharizard RMO 405th Regiment Officer

    Dremel Aluminum Oxide Grinding Stone 8193 is my go to for fine surface prep. You usually find one or two of them in big combo packs of bits or when you pick up a new tool.
     
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  3. Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
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  4. Harri51

    Harri51

    yeah turbo is right. i also use my cut off wheel sides to a high speed burn smooth too. but that is dangerous that you could slip and ding more of the foam or yourself.
     
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  5. TurboCharizard

    TurboCharizard RMO 405th Regiment Officer

    Hey look, a tool sale appears in the wild. Thanks Prop Tarts for the heads up!
    FB_IMG_1524108489683.jpg
     
  6. Dirtdives

    Dirtdives

    OOOHHHHH look!!! Even more tool sales from the wild:

    HF.jpg

    HF2.jpg
     
  7. mblackwell1002

    mblackwell1002

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  8. PerniciousDuke

    PerniciousDuke RXO 405th Regiment Officer

    Just be careful Lieutenant Jaku the rubber on those sanding drums do not hold up well to heat. Sanding along the spiral band is fine, but if you bump the tops and bottoms too much they are then very hard to change the sandpaper. This is my experience in fiberglass sanding. Foam is probably not going to mess up the bits as quickly.
     
  9. PerniciousDuke thanks for the info, I already had to remove an old one with pliers, but at least now I know what not to do.
     
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  10. TurboCharizard

    TurboCharizard RMO 405th Regiment Officer

    Bingo, the bits don't mess up as quickly on foam but that doesn't mean that it won't.

    Another thing to look into is the max duty cycle of the tool/bits. Some things simply aren't made to withstand continuous use and in the case of Dremel tools and similar rotary tools many of the operator manuals have this expressed in minutes per hour that the tool will work reliably for without fear of damage due to overheating under normal conditions. Like Duke said, rubber sanding drum interiors have a low duty cycle due to deforming from heat and will be damaged long before your tool wears out, some grinding stones will be the opposite.

    Take a look at the warranty and owners manual of your tool (shocking, I know, reading the paper instructions (who does that?)) to find a whole bunch of helpful bits of information. I even found a prize draw voucher in mine!
     

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