Duke's Skyrim Nightingale Armor

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
That is a good question TurboCharizard. Some things I will have to buy and they will most likely be hard to weather and come straight black.

For the cowl I am not sure, but it will be handmade from a thick weave black fabric.

The undersuit most likely a zentai suit for now. With things like the arm wraps being custom.

The gloves will be store bought (or thrift store) and black.

The boots. Omg. I never thought I would spend 2 hours shopping for boots online. But I think I've settled on these and adding the couple faux buckles myself.
Screenshot_20190112-093402_Amazon Shopping.jpg



Now, I think I mislead you guys with photos because no one seems to be siding with my roommate and my color choice. Lol. Let me back up a little.

Part of recreating the game character is capturing the idea of the character that people have in their mind after playing it. With the nightingale the idea is that his clothes are black. Just like when they make an action figure of him he's jet black.
20181201_171157.jpg (in game) Screenshot_20180320-102126.png (action figure)

Now the question is which one is cooler?

In person most people have responded the action figure. I agree, but I think if I were to make it jet black it would look too flat. (Turns out how to really make those ridges is wet forming. Make a wooden mold and press the leather into it)

So, what I was hoping for was something darker than the game model, but still had some color or variance to it. That's why our vote has been #4. Remember, the background is the in game model.
Screenshot_20190112-094316_Chrome.jpg
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
That is a good question TurboCharizard. Some things I will have to buy and they will most likely be hard to weather and come straight black.

For the cowl I am not sure, but it will be handmade from a thick weave black fabric.

The undersuit most likely a zentai suit for now. With things like the arm wraps being custom.

The gloves will be store bought (or thrift store) and black.

The boots. Omg. I never thought I would spend 2 hours shopping for boots online. But I think I've settled on these and adding the couple faux buckles myself.
View attachment 264092



Now, I think I mislead you guys with photos because no one seems to be siding with my roommate and my color choice. Lol. Let me back up a little.

Part of recreating the game character is capturing the idea of the character that people have in their mind after playing it. With the nightingale the idea is that his clothes are black. Just like when they make an action figure of him he's jet black.
View attachment 264103 (in game) View attachment 264105 (action figure)

Now the question is which one is cooler?

In person most people have responded the action figure. I agree, but I think if I were to make it jet black it would look too flat. (Turns out how to really make those ridges is wet forming. Make a wooden mold and press the leather into it)

So, what I was hoping for was something darker than the game model, but still had some color or variance to it. That's why our vote has been #4. Remember, the background is the in game model.
View attachment 264106
#4 will likely show a lot of contrast to the heavy knit black fabrics as well! Adding highlights to darker materials is always easier than darkening up a material.
 

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
PaiganBoi It's more like cutting foam mats. You've got to make sure you're holding your knife at 90 degrees. You've got to keep a sharp knife. You've got to over cut to get clean corners. Cut away too much and there is no going back. Now imagine a single foam puzzle piece costs $40-50 and you also have to press 10 times harder to get the knife to cut through. It's a bit stressful, but I'm almost through it. Then comes the fun part of getting the leather wet.
 

Dirtdives

RXO & Keeper of Con Lists
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
I did manage to finish cutting all those pieces last weekend! And I bought shoes online. :)

20190115_202059.jpg

Next up, tomorrow I'll be taking one of the handguards and completing the process to workout any unforeseen setbacks using as small of piece as possible. I'll round and sand the edges, cut more details in, stamp around the details, form the shape by drying it around the shape of something rigid, dye it and weather it. Wish me luck!
 

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
First run went really well!

For those of you that dont know, I like to really write out what I do. The reason is because I'm likely to forget so having something to look back on is really helpful for me. But, if someone else gets use from it then that is great too. :)


Starting with the wrist guards:

After cutting out the shape I used 150 grit sand paper to get flatter, smoother edges.
20190116_162202.jpg

Used a leather edge beveler to knock of the edge. Then finished with a 220 grit to really round it out.
20190116_162250.jpg

Used a pencil to draw a pattern onto leather tracing paper (it's like really thick wax paper)
20190116_163443.jpg

Then I used a paper towel, or sponge, to slowly wet the leather, starting with the backside and letting it seep through.
20190116_163642.jpg

With the leather wet and pliable set on a hard surface such as marble, I used a leather stylus to transfer the pattern by imprinting it in the leather.
20190116_164106.jpg 20190116_164823.jpg

Next I cut along the lines at a 90 degree angle using a swivel knife. Named because the base can swivel independently from the finger hold at the top, allowing for smooth curved cuts. Be aware of how deep you cut as well. I generally cut half as deep as the leather is.
20190116_165155.jpg 20190116_165426.jpg

Leather is abrasive and dulls knives quickly. Leather also needs to be cut cleaning, if the blade snags it will be obvious once dyed. In between cuts I sharpen my blade using the rough side of a dry piece of leather. A buffing compound called rouge is added to give the sharpened edge a better finish.
20190116_165208.jpg

Next I use a bevel stamp to push down one side of the cut, giving the leather that real 3d effect. :)
20190116_165649.jpg 20190116_170815.jpg

Next I use a background stamp (Tandy #E294-04) to hide my terrible bevel stamping abilities. :)
20190116_165551.jpg 20190116_165714.jpg 20190116_171417.jpg

I think it looks pretty cool. I took that wet leather and held it over my roommate's wrist. Holding that shape as best I could I took it to my heat gun and got it to dry in the proper shape.
20190116_172752.jpg

To achieve my desired color I apllied two coats of Eco-Flo Black Oil Dye with a paper towel, making sure to not press into the pits.
20190116_185802.jpg

Next I apllied one coat of Eco-Flo Black Smoke Hi-Lite Stain using a paper towel making sure to get all the crevices this time. I wiped excess off with a paper towel and used a heat gun to dry.
20190116_190456.jpg

I took 220 grit sandpaper and made random scuff marks.
20190116_191451.jpg

Then I applied one coat of Eco-Flo Satin Shene to seal and protect the leather. Doing so also got rid of all the visible scuffing. Oh well.
20190116_192157.jpg
 

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Here's an example of how tricky leather can be to dye:

Even with the same exact dying process one turns out black and the second, brown.
20190117_130048.jpg
Possible reasons- first one could have had more black dye in each coat, first one could have let the hi-lite black smoke sit longer before wiping off excess, second one could have not dried as long before applying shene. The shene likes to remove undried hi-lite.
 

Dirtdives

RXO & Keeper of Con Lists
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Hey PerniciousDuke.....I was watching The Curse of Oak Island the other day and I learned something I think you might find helpful.

The team was looking for a particular stone in a nearby town that was lost for about 70 years. The last sighting of it was in a book binding store. It was in the window display. The stone, although was an important part of the current investigation, was used by the binding company as a leather softener and texture "maker". They would beat the leather on the stone slab w/ a soft mallet to give it softness, texture and "character" as they put it. Perhaps that is something you could use as a technique in your build?
 

PerniciousDuke

RXO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Update:

I've figured out what was causing my colors to turn out different. Normally I would let leather dry and shape overnight. The first hand plate I heat gunned a little then went and got dinner. The second hand plate I heat gunned a lot. That caused the smooth side's pores to close and not soak as much black dye.


Exciting news though... I figured out how to get those bigger ridges. It's a technique using what's called a bone file. I pressed this plastic tool in to the reverse side over and over again during the drying process.

The result.... pretty game like if you ask me. :)
20190118_211932.jpg 20181201_171419.jpg
 
Top