help on science project =P

bionlg

New Member
Well, im lazy, or atleast just cant find anything on it >< SO, i need help on this, to get to the point, ive got a science project where i have to make a picture book about science in everyday life, or some hobby you do =P >_> and i decided to steal my brothers idea and make it on making armor, SO all i need are scentences that have to do with Elasticity, luster, porosity, hardness, viscosity, density, conductivity, solubility, flmmability, & corrosiveness being used with armor making >_> and ill take care of the rest =P
 
rofl, studying minerals I see?

hmm, how about, "I make others get hard when they see my armor" XD

lol seriously though, uh...I don't know if you can, seeing as those are terms used to describe minerals, not armor, unless your making your armor out of minerals I would say to try something else.
 

bionlg

New Member
PillowFire said:
rofl, studying minerals I see?

hmm, how about, "I make others get hard when they see my armor" XD

lol seriously though, uh...I don't know if you can, seeing as those are terms used to describe minerals, not armor, unless your making your armor out of minerals I would say to try something else.
not all of them XD >_> theyre not all rocks =l she would have told us, besides does flmability sound like a mineral term to you =P, nice joke though XD
 
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Just do it on plants just find a picture of a seed, then seed with roots, mini plant, a larger plant <.<, and full grown plant, releasing pollen, and start the cycle again. Kinda lame but it is science i used it a while back lol
 

Fragclone

Well-Known Member
lets point this out:
he stole my idea on doing the project on armor building. so he did all the werk and i just copied his seeing we had different teachers XD
 

imurray

Jr Member
I had some time on my hands (this lazy Sunday morning), so I thought I'd help a brother out.

Elasticity: When creating the mold of the armor, certain types of rubber are used. They are very pliable, with high tensile strength, and are known for their ability to retain details.

Luster: Depending on your sanding, painting, and sealing techniques, your finished armor can have anywhere from a dull sheen to a mirror-like finish.

Porosity: Several steps in the armor-making process deal with material porosity. At some stages (such as fiberglassing), you rely on the porosity of the cloth to soak up the resin. At other steps (such as mold-making), you must get rid of as much porosity as possible, or else your mold might stick to the rubber.

Hardness: Depending on your type of armor and materials used, your hardness will vary. Hardness also becomes a factor when picking out suitable mold products, such as hardness of rubber (rated on a scale called "Shore A"), or hardness of plastic (rated on a scale called "Shore D").

Viscosity: The viscosity of your materials is very important to your armor, especially to determine whether you can brush the liquid on, or if you have to pour it. Thickeners can be added at certain stages, if you require higher viscosities.

Density: There are several ways to create your armor, and of course, the different methods have different end results as well as differing densities. The amount of plastic you pour into your molds will determine their density, as will the amount of layers of resin and fiberglass you apply.

Conductivity: Normally, plastics and resins aren't very good conductors, but some armor makers like to add professional details such as lights, fans, and speakers to their pieces. These not only give the finished item a more realistic look, but also require a working knowledge of electricity, resistance, and conductivity.

Solubility: When using certain products, it's very helpful to note what other products and compounds to keep away from when making your armor. Layering a type of rubber or resin over certain tapes, glues, or papers can result in the bonds dissolving. The item then ends up as a sticky mass on your table, and is hard (if not impossible) to salvage.

Flammability: It's very important to keep away from any heat source or open flames when creating your armor. Almost all of the products in their unhardened states are flammable, sometimes combustible, and often a carcinogen or respiration hazard.

Corrosiveness: As with solubility, mixing or layering incorrect products can result in disaster. Weakness, holes, collapse, and failure to cure are all telltale signs of improper use. As with many chemicals, it's best to wear protection over your eyes and hands at all times, as many of the unhardened products can be harmful if touched, swallowed, or inhaled for long periods of time.

Let me know how these work out dude, and hopefully I helped.
 

imurray

Jr Member
I PM'd him telling him to look at this thread, and he PM'd me back saying the time had already passed.

Oh well. Just trying to get some brownie points.
 
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