How do I make a visor that has the right detailing, color, is mirrored, and see through?


JustJosh

New Member
So I don’t actually own a 3D printer, but my cousin does and he’s currently printing the halo 3 recon helmet by CollinMcCaf the main issue at the moment being how do I go about making the visor. I don’t know how to go about getting or making a visor that is the right color, is one way mirrored, and has the grooves that the helmet has in game. And tips/advice?
 

CollinMcCaf

Member
There's a vacuum forming buck included in the files. Alternatively, you can make a stamp to create the grooves before bending the visor to fit the helmet.

Typically, people will mist their visors with paint although there are chemical chroming processes (although they're expensive)

If you're particularly patient, you should try automotive window tint. If done properly it looks very good. You do have to be patient with it though, as the film will attempt to wrinkle
 

JustJosh

New Member
There's a vacuum forming buck included in the files. Alternatively, you can make a stamp to create the grooves before bending the visor to fit the helmet.

Typically, people will mist their visors with paint although there are chemical chroming processes (although they're expensive)

If you're particularly patient, you should try automotive window tint. If done properly it looks very good. You do have to be patient with it though, as the film will attempt to wrinkle
I’m still very new to this stuff so I have a couple questions. Firstly, how would I use the “vacuum forming buck” that you mentioned? Secondly, how would I go about doing the stamp method? And lastly, if I did the window tint method you mentioned, how would I keep the film from wrinkling?
 

CollinMcCaf

Member
The buck is placed on a vacuum forming machine and a plastic sheet is heated, then sucked down over top.
In the case of a stamp, you'd create a negative of the visor, then press that into a heated sheet of plastic to create the grooves.

Regarding window tint, having installed the visor either into the helmet or preferably into secondary fixture (for the sake of keeping the correct curvature) you work the film from the center outward, applying a small amount of heat. The film is wetted, then applied to the back side of the visor. A soft tool is used to squeeze the water out exposing the adhesive.
Heating the film makes it shrink but will also allow it to be stretched slightly using your tool in order to conform to the ridges created when making the grooves.

Stamping the plastic sheet (it'd be done with a thicker sheet than vacuum forming) makes applying the window tint easier as the back side is then smooth
 

JustJosh

New Member
The buck is placed on a vacuum forming machine and a plastic sheet is heated, then sucked down over top.
In the case of a stamp, you'd create a negative of the visor, then press that into a heated sheet of plastic to create the grooves.

Regarding window tint, having installed the visor either into the helmet or preferably into secondary fixture (for the sake of keeping the correct curvature) you work the film from the center outward, applying a small amount of heat. The film is wetted, then applied to the back side of the visor. A soft tool is used to squeeze the water out exposing the adhesive.
Heating the film makes it shrink but will also allow it to be stretched slightly using your tool in order to conform to the ridges created when making the grooves.

Stamping the plastic sheet (it'd be done with a thicker sheet than vacuum forming) makes applying the window tint easier as the back side is then smooth
Ok thank you. One last question I wanted to ask tho. Some people elsewhere suggested I could take some one way mirror film like this one: Mirror film and put it over the printed visor, and use a heat gun to warp it into shape. What are your thoughts on that method?
 

Benton188

RXO
405th Regiment Officer
Member DIN
S188
I know you mentioned you wanted to get the details in as well, but if you're fairly new to visor making, or cosplay crafting in general, you may have to forgo those details. Building/working with vacuum formers takes time and practice, as well as dyeing and chrome mirror finishing as well. Same goes with working with window tint, albeit it that one is a bit easier and requires less tools.
There are some Metallic Colored One Way See Through Visor materials sold on Etsy. It's a flat sheet, but it's good visor material.
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
Top