Intrusive thoughts while travelling in a car


Dreamster

Member
When traveling in a car I have a strange urge that I am going to fall out of the side I am sitting on. I also have a compulsion to want to open the car door. So far I have successfully managed to talk myself down every time this occurs. I have no reason to want to hurt myself. I do not want to hurt myself. But the compulsion stays. I have panic attacks whilst traveling in a car, and end up covered in sweat and feel as though I am going to pass out.

It has only occurred in the past few months, I have been to Dr, Optometrist, Eye Specialist had Holter monitoring, an MRI of the brain and nothing has given an answer of what is occurring. I feel as though I am going crazy as to how can such a normal day to day thing cause me so much panic and anxiety. I also feel so alone as anyone I talk to just dismisses it or has no understanding. I just feel so lost and don't know what to do. Please has anyone else experienced this at all
I can't keep going like this, I'm so afraid I am going to become housebound.
 

Hein B287

Member
Few years back i had an internship that didn't go very well. I was struggling through it and ended up getting fired. On the way back home in the car my mind seemed to wander to the thought of just crashing into a tree, drive off a bridge or just into an oncoming car. I'm not saying i was depressed during that time but it was emotionally a difficult time.

Now years later these thought still pop up from time to time. Sometimes even making me nervous while driving. I've talked about it with someone from my work and with other people close to me. That seemed to have helped. But i also tune up the radio up to max when a good song comes on. Takes my mind of that train of thought.

So you're not alone in this. I hope this helps a bit and you can find a way to live with it. ;)
 

FalseShepherd

Active Member
In my limited experience, intrusive thoughts are common in a lot of people but stronger and harder to deal with in people with certain mental disorders. My wife deals with intrusive thoughts in connection to her OCD. You should see if you can find a therapist to talk to about them.

I have had intrusive thoughts usually about jumping off bridges or similar that have felt almost like compulsions. I don't have anything diagnosed but I have a lot of things that I try to talk to my therapist about (or at least I did before my therapist moved).

From what I can tell it's fairly common and often linked to depression and similar stuff. The other thing to keep in mind is that depression and anxiety have a way of hiding and people don't really notice them immediately. It's not always obvious and doesn't necessarily present themselves in stereotypical ways. Idk where you live Dreamster, but there is plenty of cause to be depressed right now, and not just in America. Try to talk to someone and don't buy into the stigma around mental health. Working with a therapist can be the most rewarding thing you do. It's always made my life better. As a friend, that's my advice. I hope you find some answers and get to feeling better. Reach out if you need anything else.
 

ZiggyGrimm

RMO
405th Regiment Officer
I have these thoughts all the time. I honestly thought everyone had these weird compulsions. It is the same with airplane windows for me... I'm always terrified (without reason) that I'm going to get sucked out a window or that emergency door will get opened. I'll just randomly have them, the urge to actually act on them is SUPER low/ more of a "what if". It is the same compulsion that makes me check random reflective surfaces for people following me / faces I recognize.

To be clear, I'm not emotionally distressed or depressed in any way. I'm actually in a really good place and have been for quite a while. But it just goes to show that even people in a good place have weird thoughts like this rumbling around in their noodles. Now, if the urge to act on it is strong... then yeah, that is a problem, and keep seeking help.
 

Sean Anwalt

Sr Member
Member DIN
S530
You are not alone. Many people suffer these intrusive thoughts. I have had intrusive thoughts, my wife has had intrusive thoughts... I thought everyone did. (Lots of long posts, please read through them, these guys are awesome and have great unput.)

The reader's digest version of what works for me is this:
1) Realize it is an intrusive thought, which has no bearing on the real world and ought not influence you in any way.
2) Acknowledge the thought exists, and banish it. Don't store stuff in or bottle it up, you will eventually explode.
3) Find something, like music, motivational quotes, or holy scripture, that replace the void immediately after banishing the thought. Not sure what your thing will be, but if you don't have something to focus on in a positive way, (depending on the severity and the root of the issue) you can relapse pretty quick.

My wife worked in mental health prior to the kid coming along, and in my work I see a need for improvement world wide in mental health resources. Not sure what the actual correlation between intrusive thoughts and mental health is, but there is definitely a relation.

I used to work at a job that was pretty stressful, back in 2016 and 2017. During that time, stuff happened, (saw things, heard things, got run over by a motorcycle, lost the job, it was great) and as a result I ended up getting some post traumatic stress disorder. Had no idea a ton of little things could build up like that, I thought PTSD was for people who deployed over seas and shot dogs and stuff, but when I sat down with a therapist they had me take a test and sure enough: I had it.

Since then I've come up with this like.... I dunno how I'd describe it... Life foundation, I guess, and when things get off-kilter I default back to the basics. Not gonna get preachy, don't worry. But here is how I figured one can lead a pretty squared away life:

Make sure you have a good, healthy balance in three categories: Physical, Spiritual, and emotional.
1) Physical - take care of your body. For obvious reasons. Wanna feel good you have to, you know, Feel Good.
2) Spiritual - not gonna tell you to join a religion or anything, but a basic belief in something bigger than yourself is a fundamental step in basic mental well-being. Do not focus on yourself, focus on other people, and the horrible feelings will begin to fade.
3) Emotional (Also called mental) - A lot of thing affect us every day on an emotional level, even when we don't realize it. (At least that's what my therapist said. As a distant evolutionary cousin to Chuck Norris, I don't actually HAVE emotions, but most people do. XD ) It is important to make sure you have equal amounts of hard work, good fun, and decent sleep. Overdoing one of those categories throws the other two off, and I'm willing to bet causes more than half the mental illness out there.

At the end of the day, you have to take the steps yourself, don't just over-talk it with people, you know? Won't get anywhere just with talk.

So there's my input. You aren't alone, man. I understand quite a few of us here on the 405th suffer some kind of mental illness like depression or OCD or PTSD or all of the above or whatever, and that's fine. I think calling it mental ILLNESS is a little harsh, but the fact of the matter is, we as a group are here to support ourselves, and while it's impossible to meet in person at every bump in the road, many of us are always on and can talk.

Also, just a thought. If you haven't already, watch this video, and do the things he says. This is pretty good:

Keep your stick on the ice. We're all in this together.
 
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PlanetAlexander

Well-Known Member
1) Physical - take care of your body. For obvious reasons. Wanna feel good you have to, you know, Feel Good.
2) Spiritual - not gonna tell you to join a religion or anything, but a basic belief in something bigger than yourself is a fundamental step in basic mental well-being. Do not focus on yourself, focus on other people, and the horrible feelings will begin to fade.
3) Emotional (Also called mental) - A lot of thing affect us every day on an emotional level, even when we don't realize it. (At least that's what my therapist said. As a distant evolutionary cousin to Chuck Norris, I don't actually HAVE emotions, but most people do. XD ) It is important to make sure you have equal amounts of hard work, good fun, and decent sleep. Overdoing one of those categories throws the other two off, and I'm willing to bet causes more than half the mental illness out there.

Very glad you mentioned this Sean. The concept of mind, body and spirit was very important to me a couple of years ago and still holds relevance today. This might be digressing from the overall topic a little. I feel that to work on just improving one aspect of all that, you have to improve all three - like the three legged stool. Back in 2018 I needed to make myself a lot stronger, but I knew physical strength wasn't all to it. A big part of it was in my mind, pushing myself to work harder and go further. And if I got stronger physically, I had more mental confidence to deal with things.

Some people might say the concept of mind, body and spirit is stupid, but it's very important - as Sean said, spirit isn't just about religion. It's about belief and faith.
 

Hein B287

Member
1) Physical - take care of your body. For obvious reasons. Wanna feel good you have to, you know, Feel Good.
This is one of the things that make hard to deal with this whole pandemic and subsequent lockdown. Haven't had a haircut in months. Can't go to the gym to work out. But it is thanks to family and friends (and the 405th) that i can pull through.
 

Sean Anwalt

Sr Member
Member DIN
S530
This is one of the things that make hard to deal with this whole pandemic and subsequent lockdown. Haven't had a haircut in months. Can't go to the gym to work out. But it is thanks to family and friends (and the 405th) that i can pull through.
My wife downloaded this app on my phone called Fiton. It's not amazing physical activity, but it's pretty good, and you can do it at home.
 
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