pronounciation of mjolnir

pacbury

Member
i have the audio books so you'd expect me to know but i dont, in the first 3 its mojolneer in ghost of onyx which is read by a diferent person its moilnir personallyi prefer mojolneer...
and before you ask i don't have contact harvest yet, well i have the normal book...
 

23Magnum

Well-Known Member
Ok, a while ago on another one of these topics, I said I would ask my older brother to finally put this to rest. He has a degree in English Literature at Northwestern, and he also studies a lot of history, specifically about Europe and ancient cultures. So I figured he would know. Any how, I finally got a response from him which follows...

Hi, Matt. I've been looking through my books on Icelandic sagas and Norse mythology, but none of them have a pronunciation guide. My independent conclusion would be to pronounce the word MYOL-neer (the mj like the fj in "fjord"--m as in "mom" and y as in "yard"). That's based on known pronunciations of other norse or Icelandic words.

But Wikipedia seems to indicate a pronunciation of the "mj" as the two consonants would sound in English (m as in "mom" and j as in "juice") with the "i" pronounced as an unstressed schwa sound (the vowel sound used in the unstressed syllables of most English words, such as the "al" in "cereal").

So I'm sorry that I can't give you a definitive answer, but my money is on "MYOL-neer." Take care, and I'll talk to you soon.

Enjoy the photos.

David


The last part about the photos are of his lastest trip to Vienna, Budapest, Munich, and Prague. He gets to go to such cool places.

Anyway, I know that his response didn't really finalize this fully, but I'd trust my brother on this subject over anything I would read on the internet.

-Magnum
 

23Magnum

Well-Known Member
S1l3nt V1p3r said:
It is Mee-yohl-near. Trust me, I know. ;)
It's not a long E after the M though, and it should only be two syllables. I've checked all over the internet and even my brother says it. How about you explain how you know so we can actually trust you?

-Magnum
 
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Spartan857

Well-Known Member
ive always heard it pronounced Mij-al-nyr. thats how i pronounce it and being of viking descent i can say it however i please :lol:
 

S1l3nt V1p3r

Sr Member
23Magnum said:
It's not a long E after the M though, and it should only be two syllables. I've checked all over the internet and even my brother says it. How about you explain how you know so we can actually trust you?

-Magnum
Because I just know. Being the decendant from the vikings, and all that. ;)
 
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23Magnum

Well-Known Member
Being a descendant of a culture doesn't really count when the language is a dead one anyway. Dead Language means no one speaks it anymore. So, really in the end you could say it what ever way you want. Here's a site to look over if you'd like. UT: LRC

-Magnum
 

Spartan857

Well-Known Member
23Magnum said:
Being a descendant of a culture doesn't really count when the language is a dead one anyway. Dead Language means no one speaks it anymore. So, really in the end you could say it what ever way you want. Here's a site to look over if you'd like. UT: LRC

-Magnum

the language isnt totally dead. theres alot of people in sweden and surrounding countries that still practice the language for ceremonies, like Midvinterblot
 
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S1l3nt V1p3r

Sr Member
23Magnum said:
Being a descendant of a culture doesn't really count when the language is a dead one anyway. Dead Language means no one speaks it anymore. So, really in the end you could say it what ever way you want. Here's a site to look over if you'd like. UT: LRC

-Magnum
Correction: Iceland still uses the old norse language. Since Iceland never has been occupied since the old Viking settlement, it seems likely that the language has not changed much.
 
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