Tutorial: Using Casting Resin For Your Pep Build

Ruze789

Well-Known Member
This is a tutorial thread, I really don't think necro applies when asking a question about the topic.

Spartan 122 said:
Is that toxic and with a strong smell? Where I can find it?
It is not toxic when in the liquid form, meaning you can use it to harden just fine. It does not smell too strongly.
When it is sanded it creates very harmful dust though, it should not be done indoors and a mask should be used.

I got my small kit at dickblick.com, though there's lots of other places, you can find with a search for Smooth-cast 300.
Here's the DickBlick page
 
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GeneralMayhem

Active Member
Maybe it's time we stopped being "Necro" Nazi's and relized that it doesn't matter when someone contributes to a subject, as long as they contribute.
 

Macattack64

Well-Known Member
This may be an older thread, but Can you fiberglass resin the outside before you do any plastic?
 

Achille

Member
Yes, you can, but you really shouldn't need to. As long as you use small amounts of resin (3-4 oz.) to start, you should be fine in terms of warping. Once you get a film of thin, hardened resin over the entire inside, it will be okay for you to start pouring in more resin per batch.
 

Ruze789

Well-Known Member
Macattack64 said:
This may be an older thread, but Can you fiberglass resin the outside before you do any plastic?
You can. It might help with some of the minor warping that happens. If you build your pep piece with this method in mind, you should be able to close up any gaps as you go, there really is minimal leaking.

If you don't do it though, the SmoothCast will seep into the cardstock as it cures and the outside will become stiff as well.
 
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LastSpartan

Sr Member
A good way to avoid leaking is to add microspheres to your first batch mix.

It thickens the mix and reduces the resin flow.
 

GeneralMayhem

Active Member
Ruze789 said:
You can. It might help with some of the minor warping that happens. If you build your pep piece with this method in mind, you should be able to close up any gaps as you go, there really is minimal leaking.

If you don't do it though, the SmoothCast will seep into the cardstock as it cures and the outside will become stiff as well.

Not if you coat the card stock with Vaseline.
 
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Spartan 051

Well-Known Member
LastSpartan said:
It will prevent leaking.
To prevent from leaking i found if you clear coat it with a clear enamel (mate or gloss) it

I did it with my fallout T-51b helm and i only lost a couple of oz's.

photo-1.jpg


EDIT: This thing big around two mark 6 helms on top of each other and did not warp
 
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Remraf

Active Member
I know, from experience, that it will work. I had resined my entire helm and fiberglassed about 1/3 of it, and I didn't have any problems. I will probably resin my helms first just because I'd rather have a stiffer piece to pour into.
 

Macattack64

Well-Known Member
What I'm saying is that the resin while seal up and holes and also help minimize warping. And that way I could leave the piece for a little bit longer if I don't get around to plasticing certain pieces. I just feel a little better resining it first...
 

JediStumpy

Well-Known Member
Macattack64 said:
What I'm saying is that the resin while seal up and holes and also help minimize warping. And that way I could leave the piece for a little bit longer if I don't get around to plasticing certain pieces. I just feel a little better resining it first...
I plan on coating my new helm i'm working on with a layer of fb resin 1st (like you would when you fb it. after the fb resin, I plan on coating the inside with some smooth-on ROTO.

The resin is really just to seal up the helmet, and also to make it stiff/hard before i "roto cast" the inside. (I hope to make a video tut to help out)
 
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Achille

Member
Macattack64 said:
And that way I could leave the piece for a little bit longer if I don't get around to plasticing certain pieces.
If you wait too long between batches, the resin will form a film over itself, and the following layers won't stick as easily. Unless you want to have to wash the ENTIRE inside of the helmet with soap and warm water (And if it's not fully resined, I wouldn't), you should try to do it all in one batch.
 
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GeneralMayhem

Active Member
Actually, you should do the entire piece in one sitting, not necessarily one single batch. You can keep adding layers before each previous batch has cured, and you shouldn't have to worry about the piece de-laminating as it cools.
 

Achille

Member
:oops: Woops, I should have made that clearer. I did mean in one sitting, not one batch of resin.

Thanks for the correction.
 

Remraf

Active Member
Macattack64 said:
What I'm saying is that the resin while seal up and holes and also help minimize warping. And that way I could leave the piece for a little bit longer if I don't get around to plasticing certain pieces. I just feel a little better resining it first...
I don't think he means stopping between layers of on, say, a helmet, but resining multiple armor pieces (helmet and forearm, for example) so they will hold their shape in case he can't add the plastic to both imediately.

I think another advantage of resining first would be that you could put support struts in for resining so it will hold it's shape, then take them out when you add the SC 300. The FS hi-def helm, for example, has tons of struts that would really be in the way for adding the SC.
 
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Arata117

New Member
Thank you so much for this tutorial I wanted to give resin casting a try but I didn’t know where to start. Also the helmet you made in the tutorial looks nice.
 
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