"Help!" for: Fiberglassing, Resin, & Bondo

RYNO 666

Well-Known Member
y7y5u9e7.jpg
Yes it is possible I'm using it currently right now. You need thickener THX-6. Also I've been using Poly Fiber II just add to mix and it's better than bondo in my opinion.:)

Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk 2
 

Virti

Jr Member
It can't hurt to try them. Some foams do dissolve, but you can't be sure until you try your own personal set. There are a lot of different types of foam out there afterall!

thanks Im not sure if they will but im going to give it a try on the inside to see :)
 

Katsu

Well-Known Member
Hello, I am wondering if for an alternative to bondo could I use my aqua resin and just mix a lot mote hardener (the powdery stuff) then the liquid? So I can have a bondo like substance that is non toxic and indoor user friendly?

In addition to Cola's response, I'd also like to add that in order to get the same results with aqua resin as bondo, you will easily be spending much more money for aqua resin. Resins are thin fluid like hot honey, while bondo is more like a putty, so to get the bulk that rondo gives to properly fill in gaps, you're going to need to use a lot of resin, and aqua resin is also substantially more expensive than regular poly/epoxy resin.

I just priced them, and aqua resin runs 26 USD to get "enough to cover a square foot" of surface. A large can of fiberglass resin runs 13ish USD and covers about 11 square feet of surface.

Resin: Benefits: strong, waterproof, cheap; Drawbacks: Toxic, irritant;
Aqua: Benefits: Safe, non-toxic, work indoors; Drawbacks: Expensive, not waterproof, weaker;
Bondo: Benefits: Thick, moldable, cuttable, sandable; Drawbacks: Heavy, toxic, irritant, weaker;

The point to make is.. you can do whatever you want, but be aware that each option has its benefits and drawbacks, and you need to take them into consideration when making a decision.
 

Jason 078

Well-Known Member
The Epoximate 100 with the 101 fast hardener is a good resin for indoors use, but you should still wear some protection (just for safety). If you want rondo-like action with it, just add the Ure-Fil 11 thickening compound. That makes the epoxy thicker for "brush-on molds" and translates easily into the way we all use Rondo.
 

RYNO 666

Well-Known Member
Aqua Resin

Aqua Resin, manufactured by the Aqua Resin Company, is a water-based resin that can be used in fiberglass applications. Several forms are available and one has fiberglass roving mixed in with the compound, called Aqua Glass. It is water-based, but once cured, it is impervious to water. Strength-wise, it is claimed to be stronger than conventional fiberglass.

I save money on brushes tools etc. Plus no hazmat suit required. It's very cost comparative in this regard.

Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk 2
 

Charzii

New Member
Thanks! :) I saw your suggestion jason but I also saw a few posts about doing that to the aqua resin, so I was undecided between the two. Thanks for helping me! And other noobies :)
 

RobotChicken

Well-Known Member
Question regarding laying of fiberglass cloth: I read from multiple posts about first tacking the fiberglass in place (with a spray adhesive, say) and then brush the resin on. How well does this work? I mean, if the glass is glued to the surface, that would imply to me that resin doesn't exist between the glass and the surface, only wicked up within the glass's fibers instead. So the primary bonding medium of the cloth to the surface is mostly the adhesive rather than the resin. This is working out for people? Or, does the resin manage to seep between the cloth and mix with the adhesive? I was planning to use a spray version of Elmer's white glue, unless there's a different product that gives better results...? Thanks.
 

Jason 078

Well-Known Member
Question regarding laying of fiberglass cloth: I read from multiple posts about first tacking the fiberglass in place (with a spray adhesive, say) and then brush the resin on. How well does this work? I mean, if the glass is glued to the surface, that would imply to me that resin doesn't exist between the glass and the surface, only wicked up within the glass's fibers instead. So the primary bonding medium of the cloth to the surface is mostly the adhesive rather than the resin. This is working out for people? Or, does the resin manage to seep between the cloth and mix with the adhesive? I was planning to use a spray version of Elmer's white glue, unless there's a different product that gives better results...? Thanks.
This is a good question. When you lay down the initial spray, you just need enough to adhere the fiberglass, not to cover the entire inner surface. Just a light spray to make the surface tacky to stick the pieces of fiberglass cloth into it. This will leave enough space between the fiberglass cloth and the surface of the item to adhere it. Also, depending on what you plan to use as the hardening medium, it might dissolve the glue, which would take care of the little places that are covered by the adhesive.
 

Katsu

Well-Known Member
I don't think you should spray adhesive at all for the exact reason you mention robotchicken. That glue is going to be weaving through the cloth instead of the resin which will effectively be sitting on top of it instead of within.

If you want to make the mat stick down, dab some resin down first and use THAT as your adhesive, then put the mat on it and paint on the rest of the resin.
 

RobotChicken

Well-Known Member
Yep, that was the alternate option I've been juggling in my mind, which is why I asked the original question - to find out the pros and cons either way. Overall, I'd have to say I'm leaning towards using resin rather than spray adhesive, to be sure of thorough infusion.
 

Carpathia

Sr Member
That's the method I use exclusively for laying down fiberglass (brushing on a bit of resin then dab the fiberglass into it). Using that method, I rarely have ends of fiberglass poking up. I usually get a very smooth glassing job.
 

Cheezmo619

New Member
so I've applied a layer of fiberglass resin on the outside. I made the mistake of trying to coat both helmets at the same time. I ended up with clumps if resin. what is the best way to remove these clumps?
 

RobotChicken

Well-Known Member
so I've applied a layer of fiberglass resin on the outside. I made the mistake of trying to coat both helmets at the same time. I ended up with clumps if resin. what is the best way to remove these clumps?

If it's cured, Dremel would be easier than sandpaper or file.
 

vapir

Member
Quick Question.
For hardening my peps, I'm using smooth-cast 320.
It works just fine to prevent the Rondo used on the inside to wrap and destroy the the piece.
But it doesn't soak into the paper like 'normal' resin would, which is therefor not as good to sand down.
Any tips on getting the paper soaked ?
 

Katsu

Well-Known Member
What type of paper are you using??

heavy cardstock that has been painted with resin won't warp. If you are using normal printer paper, it will have trouble with rondo or resin.
 

Carpathia

Sr Member
Any tips on getting the paper soaked ?

I sometimes run into this problem as well with polyester resin (the resin cures on the outside or inside without soaking into the paper fibers). I've not had many problems because of this, however. Sometimes, as you are worried about, I sand down to "dry" paper. This can be resolved by putting a few drops of crazy glue onto the paper fibers that are showing through, and a light sand when the glue cures to smooth it out. If it still shows through after you put a coat of primer on, let the primer dry overnight, sand it out a bit and apply another coat of primer. That should alleviate that problem (at least it has for me in the past).

Edit: If you take a look at my Carter helmet (from way back when), you can see on the upper right portion, some paper has been sanded through and is showing pretty badly through the primer...

DSC04044.jpg


For that, I ended up doing what I suggested to you; I let the primer dry overnight, then sanded those exposed fibers (which were saturated with primer). The result (after another coat of primer and black paint) was this...

DSC04124.jpg


You can see that the paper fibers are completely gone.

So, moral of the story, it's not a huge deal if the resin/smoothcast does not saturate the paper.
 

Ciroth

New Member
I have a question regarding glassing the inside of pep. We have been using Bondo Short Hair Fiberglass. Its like Bondo, but with fiberglass strands inside of it. We used a 50/50 mix with Resin. Have anyone else used this? Or has anyone found that it does not work very well?
 
Top