Legendary Armor - MA5C Assault Rifle

rowan

Well-Known Member
If you start selling those shirts ill defiantly buy some!
Excellent work on the AR so far! Can’t wait to see the finished product (you guys are freaking awesome at this)
 

Ruze789

Well-Known Member
Wow... I haven't checked on this thread for a while. That thing looks awwwwwwwwesome, guys!
Even the barrel is impressive looking...

Is this going to be rubber like your SW blasters?
 

BishopX

Well-Known Member
Rubber is the idea for sure. We've decided to use the Surefire 9P flashlight for the MA5C. True, it's about $100 but it looks good with the rifle. It's very bright too.
 

BishopX

Well-Known Member
LOL. The MA5C goes into the mold hopefully by early next week. I'll show you some finished pictures when we get the mold done.
 

tubachris85x

Well-Known Member
Oh for the love of god and all that is holy on this planet, will you be making these available to the public in the future???
 

LiuAnXiang

Jr Member
What kind of college/high school courses would I need to take to get into the industry you're working in?
(movie prop-making, right?)

Actually, what courses did you take to learn all this? Because I want to be able to do it too, not just go :eek: over such godliness.

I want to be a part of it :-D
 

BishopX

Well-Known Member
You can't work on at union show (99% of the well paying shows) without being a union member. You can't get into the union without working on a union show. Tell me how that appears to work?!? You either have to be working on a show that is non-union and somehow turns into a union show or work in a prophouse where they have an apprenticeship program. Neither are easy to come by. We are one of two prophouse that have apprenticeship programs.

Propmaking is not a course that I know of. Most of our propmakers come from other industries but have a lot to offer coming in.

Cabinet makers tend to be the most flexible and most productive. We have not figured out why. They can or learn to machine and are able to turn jobs around quickly. If you can't turn around a job quickly and good, you will not last the day.

Machinists work out okay although generally, are not very fast. They tend to be too concerned with tolerances. Movies look like they work....they usually do not have to for real.

Welders are required often for rigging and such. They need to be able to do other things though. As a propmaker, you need to be able to do most everything to some extent.

Electronics. Carpenters, welders, machinists....they don't get the electronics generally. Electronics propmakers are hard to come by. Generally, electronics guys can only do electronics. They are not usually good at anything else. We bring them in when we need them and send them packing when we are done.

Painters. This is a handy skill to have. Painting for props is very different than painting anything else. You use every technique available. Shiny rubber sword blades that the paint doesn't crack off of. Car paint finishes. Washes. Textures of cracking wood, etc. You get props last and you have the least amount of time to do what you need to do. "Paint this MDF tombstone to look like marble and it leaves in about 2 hours."

The truth is that you have to be well rounded to survive and be called back to work the next day. In the film industry, everyone is on call...meaning you don't know if you are working tomorrow until you see your name on the call sheet at the end of the day. You can be laid off for no reason or for someone just disliking your hair. It's that simple.

It's not a very stable industry until you are settled in to a niche. I don't know if I've have helped or scared you but good luck.
 

Roodkill

Member
BishopX said:
You can't work on at union show (99% of the well paying shows) without being a union member. You can't get into the union without working on a union show. Tell me how that appears to work?!? You either have to be working on a show that is non-union and somehow turns into a union show or work in a prophouse where they have an apprenticeship program. Neither are easy to come by. We are one of two prophouse that have apprenticeship programs.

Propmaking is not a course that I know of. Most of our propmakers come from other industries but have a lot to offer coming in.

Cabinet makers tend to be the most flexible and most productive. We have not figured out why. They can or learn to machine and are able to turn jobs around quickly. If you can't turn around a job quickly and good, you will not last the day.

Machinists work out okay although generally, are not very fast. They tend to be too concerned with tolerances. Movies look like they work....they usually do not have to for real.

Welders are required often for rigging and such. They need to be able to do other things though. As a propmaker, you need to be able to do most everything to some extent.

Electronics. Carpenters, welders, machinists....they don't get the electronics generally. Electronics propmakers are hard to come by. Generally, electronics guys can only do electronics. They are not usually good at anything else. We bring them in when we need them and send them packing when we are done.

Painters. This is a handy skill to have. Painting for props is very different than painting anything else. You use every technique available. Shiny rubber sword blades that the paint doesn't crack off of. Car paint finishes. Washes. Textures of cracking wood, etc. You get props last and you have the least amount of time to do what you need to do. "Paint this MDF tombstone to look like marble and it leaves in about 2 hours."

The truth is that you have to be well rounded to survive and be called back to work the next day. In the film industry, everyone is on call...meaning you don't know if you are working tomorrow until you see your name on the call sheet at the end of the day. You can be laid off for no reason or for someone just disliking your hair. It's that simple.

It's not a very stable industry until you are settled in to a niche. I don't know if I've have helped or scared you but good luck.
Sadly I don't have the real intel for welding nor the capabilities to attempt so. However, I DO have experiance painting, sculpting, molding, AND electronics. I've been doing this sort of stuff from about age 8 and really got into it about 5 years ago. Along with my friend, we have about 12 years of colaborated experiance doing this work. But! BUT! We're both still in high school living out of our parents houses. I'm not asking for a job or even any real consideration with that, (but that's be nice ;) ) What I am saying is, if you guys at Legendary Armor ( or anyone ) has questions about electronics and what materials maybe used or fail in your project I'll gladly give answers and/or suggestions.

( I signed up less than a month but that doesn't mean I'm clueless. Just held off until I was sure I could help)
:D

But you guys have managed by yourselfs this far, I'm just a fall back if you'd like. Good work as always.
 
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BishopX

Well-Known Member
Sorry about that....not trying to paint a dark picture. This industry is great for the young and single. I'd go back to college if I could do it all over again.
 

SGT Razor

Well-Known Member
That "New Pictures Posted" thing is really throwing me off, haha. I keep coming back and re-re-re-reading everything thinking my internet is a piece of crap. :rolleyes
 

rowan

Well-Known Member
I've been looking at the propmaking as a career for a while now; I’m still in school (in Australia). Any info on the apprenticeship courses that your company offer would be great (as well as any other propmaking companies, ill have a look around the web next time in home, but any suggestions would be great)
I’m actually making my mjolnir armor for a last year subject (design and technology units 3/4, year 12 subject, I’m in year 11)
And I absolutely LOVE the work you guys have done so far. It is truly god-like. It inspires me to try harder and experiment with different methods for my own props!
 

LiuAnXiang

Jr Member
BishopX said:
You can't work on at union show (99% of the well paying shows) without being a union member. You can't get into the union without working on a union show. Tell me how that appears to work?!? You either have to be working on a show that is non-union and somehow turns into a union show or work in a prophouse where they have an apprenticeship program. Neither are easy to come by. We are one of two prophouse that have apprenticeship programs.

Propmaking is not a course that I know of. Most of our propmakers come from other industries but have a lot to offer coming in.

Cabinet makers tend to be the most flexible and most productive. We have not figured out why. They can or learn to machine and are able to turn jobs around quickly. If you can't turn around a job quickly and good, you will not last the day.

Machinists work out okay although generally, are not very fast. They tend to be too concerned with tolerances. Movies look like they work....they usually do not have to for real.

Welders are required often for rigging and such. They need to be able to do other things though. As a propmaker, you need to be able to do most everything to some extent.

Electronics. Carpenters, welders, machinists....they don't get the electronics generally. Electronics propmakers are hard to come by. Generally, electronics guys can only do electronics. They are not usually good at anything else. We bring them in when we need them and send them packing when we are done.

Painters. This is a handy skill to have. Painting for props is very different than painting anything else. You use every technique available. Shiny rubber sword blades that the paint doesn't crack off of. Car paint finishes. Washes. Textures of cracking wood, etc. You get props last and you have the least amount of time to do what you need to do. "Paint this MDF tombstone to look like marble and it leaves in about 2 hours."

The truth is that you have to be well rounded to survive and be called back to work the next day. In the film industry, everyone is on call...meaning you don't know if you are working tomorrow until you see your name on the call sheet at the end of the day. You can be laid off for no reason or for someone just disliking your hair. It's that simple.

It's not a very stable industry until you are settled in to a niche. I don't know if I've have helped or scared you but good luck.

A bit of both, actually. But thanks.
 
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mee

New Member
p0rtalman said:
I've been looking at the propmaking as a career for a while now; I’m still in school (in Australia). Any info on the apprenticeship courses that your company offer would be great (as well as any other propmaking companies, ill have a look around the web next time in home, but any suggestions would be great)
I’m actually making my mjolnir armor for a last year subject (design and technology units 3/4, year 12 subject, I’m in year 11)
And I absolutely LOVE the work you guys have done so far. It is truly god-like. It inspires me to try harder and experiment with different methods for my own props!
Hay that sounds cool, im in yr 8 and i was thinkin of making Marine armor and a magmim.I live in Australia as well.
 
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