Bondo & Fiberglass Question

SkyBox

New Member
<div class="bbWrapper">Hi, I am in the early stages of my Halo 5 Noble Gen 2 Armor build I am currently just cutting all the paper out for each of the armor parts and putting them into seperate boxes so I dont have to worry about them till later. (except for a few pieces which seem very complex to unfold. Mostly the Chest plate because alot of the pieces are off the main pep pages and It gives me a headache to look at. anyways, I just have a few questions about bondo &amp; fiberglass which I am sure have been asked on the site before but I would really like to know.<br /> <br /> Bondo<br /> <br /> 1. How many layers of bondo do I apply, I know its about 3 coats for the helm but is it the same for other parts?<br /> <br /> 2. Should I find a specific section to do the Bondo at a time, So if I am doing the ChestPlate do the top right, wait, do the top left wait etc, then apply a second layer etc?<br /> <br /> 3. For the small crevices what do I do with them? Do I not bondo them at first then use bondo later, Do I not fill them at all, or do I just ignore them and go over them?<br /> <br /> Fiberglass<br /> <br /> 1. for enclosed props like grenades and weapons do I resin the Inside, or do I just not bother fiber glassing and just apply a layer of resin on the outside.<br /> <br /> 2. Do I fiber and resin the other armor pieces like the forearms?<br /> <br /> Outside of all of this I have a pretty good understanding of what to do.</div>
 

FlyinPhil

Well-Known Member
<div class="bbWrapper">Some areas need no bondo at all.. Just a little sanding. Some areas might need a few layers of bondo depending on how much smoothing/shaping needs to be done. You DON'T NEED MUCH. If you are putting on more than 1-2mm, you are using too much. Body filler is made to fill small dents and imperfections, not become part of the structure of an object.<br /> <br /> Bondo has a fairly short working time. I would coat a small section, wait for it to cure (can be between 5-10 minutes depending on how you mix it) then sand it smooth. When the bondo is still in a sort of &quot;jelly&quot; or soft state, it can be easily shaped with a sharp razor blade as well. I would recommend against doing multiple layers without sanding in between, as it shouldn't be necessary to lay it on that thick.<br /> <br /> As for small crevices, try to keep the bondo out of them. Why spend tons of time folding and glueing the details together, only to cover them up?<br /> <br /> For fiberglass:<br /> <br /> All of your armor parts will require fiberglass on the inside of the parts. It's what gives them strength.<br /> <br /> Pep isn't an ideal way to make weapons. For something small like a grenade, though, I would resin the outside. Then drill a hole to slosh some resin around on the inside as well. I would stay away from pepping guns, there are better ways to make them.</div>
 

HeroMinerR5

Member
<div class="bbWrapper">For bondo. If i am doing piece that have a lot of edges like the mark 6 shoulder or any peice. I use Rondo the mixture of Bondo and Fiberglass resin. It is a lot more quicker and smoother with a lot less of sanding. It is a litte sticking but after the primer and letting it cure for about 1 or 2 hours it is ready to be paint. That want I do and it work pretty good so far.</div>
 

SkyBox

New Member
<div class="bbWrapper"><blockquote class="bbCodeBlock bbCodeBlock--expandable bbCodeBlock--quote"> <div class="bbCodeBlock-title"> <a href="/forums/goto/post?id=743518" class="bbCodeBlock-sourceJump" data-xf-click="attribution" data-content-selector="#post-743518">HeroMinerR5 said:</a> </div> <div class="bbCodeBlock-content"> <div class="bbCodeBlock-expandContent "> For bondo. If i am doing piece that have a lot of edges like the mark 6 shoulder or any peice. I use Rondo the mixture of Bondo and Fiberglass resin. It is a lot more quicker and smoother with a lot less of sanding. It is a litte sticking but after the primer and letting it cure for about 1 or 2 hours it is ready to be paint. That want I do and it work pretty good so far. </div> <div class="bbCodeBlock-expandLink"><a>Click to expand...</a></div> </div> </blockquote>I have heard different things about rondo. I hear that alot of people use it, but i have heard quite a few downsides to it... mind telling me a bit more, i know this stuff is opinionated but i want my first build to be as best as i can get it.</div>
 

HeroMinerR5

Member
<div class="bbWrapper"><blockquote class="bbCodeBlock bbCodeBlock--expandable bbCodeBlock--quote"> <div class="bbCodeBlock-title"> <a href="/forums/goto/post?id=743525" class="bbCodeBlock-sourceJump" data-xf-click="attribution" data-content-selector="#post-743525">SkyBox said:</a> </div> <div class="bbCodeBlock-content"> <div class="bbCodeBlock-expandContent "> I have heard different things about rondo. I hear that alot of people use it, but i have heard quite a few downsides to it... mind telling me a bit more, i know this stuff is opinionated but i want my first build to be as best as i can get it. </div> <div class="bbCodeBlock-expandLink"><a>Click to expand...</a></div> </div> </blockquote>If you do rondo do more than one layer on top and don't pour it on your armor, just use a paint brush so the rondo don't make hill on or in your armor piece. And it can smooth it out better.</div>
 

HeroMinerR5

Member
<div class="bbWrapper">Add one more thing. Don't rush the rondo to cure or it will be really stickly for a lot time. Follow my thread and you can see how my process is going by using rondo</div>
 

FlyinPhil

Well-Known Member
<div class="bbWrapper">Rondo will kill any detail on the outside of a piece. It is just &quot;thinned&quot; out body filler. Body filler is a mixture of talc powder and polyester resin. Adding more resin will make it harder to sand, and more liquidy (harder to keep where you want it). <br /> <br /> Adding rondo to the inside of a piece of armor is not a good idea either. It has very little structural integrity, and it is heavy. All you need on the inside of an armor part is fiberglass cloth/mat (mat is a tad easier to work with with lots of varying shapes and angles) and polyester (fiberglass) resin or epoxy resin.</div>
 
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