Dampfhulk

New Member
Welche Möglichkeiten habe ich beim Kauf von EVA-Schaum? (Mit Sitz in den USA)

Bodenfliesen
Eine kostengünstige, leicht verfügbare Quelle für EVA-Schaum sind Fußmatten oder Bodenfliesen. Bodenfliesen finden Sie in den meisten Baumärkten oder Sportgeschäften. Die Fliesen können auf einer oder beiden Seiten eine Textur aufweisen, die möglicherweise abgeschliffen werden muss, wenn keine Textur gewünscht wird. Obwohl Bodenfliesen in verschiedenen Größen und Stärken erhältlich sind, sind die üblichen Abmessungen etwa 24 "x 24" mit einer Dicke von etwa ⅜ "-½"

Durchschnittliche Kosten: $ 0,56 - $ 1,56 pro Quadratfuß
In der Regel in 4er-Packs für etwa 9 bis 25 US-Dollar gekauft

Standorte: Hafenfracht, Home Depot, Lowe's, Target, Walmart, Amazon usw.

View attachment 286333

Rollen / Blätter
EVA-Schaumstoffrollen sind etwas teurer als die meisten Bodenfliesen und können sowohl bei Schaumlieferanten online als auch in Cosplay-Shops gekauft werden. Rollen und Bleche sind im Vergleich zu Bodenfliesen die teurere Option, bieten jedoch mehrere Vorteile. Rollen und Blätter sind normalerweise auf beiden Seiten glatt und tendieren dazu, innerhalb der Marke in Bezug auf Dichte und Dicke gleichmäßiger zu sein. Wenn Ihre Schablonen große Stücke zum Ausschneiden haben, ist die Verwendung großer Rollen großartig, da keine Oberflächennähte erforderlich sind.

Durchschnittliche Kosten: 0,80 USD - 2,50 USD pro Quadratfuß
Standorte: TNT Cosplay, Amazon, Schaumfabrik, SKS Requisiten, Joann Fabric usw.

View attachment 286337
ich use all of them.
 

JBSkittles

New Member
Tips/tools and misc. for working with foam
  1. Wear a respirator with a particulate filter or a particulate mask when sanding foam. Even though EVA is generally considered safe, if you’re sanding the foam it can create a fine dust that is not good for your respiratory system.
  2. Use Barge if you can. Hot glue is a common low cost, non-toxic choice of adhesive for bonding foam, however contact cement (e.g. Barge) is a stronger option that makes it easier to bond foam with minimal seams. Just note that contact cement needs good ventilation and/or an organic vapors respirator (~$30 USD).
  3. Keep your blades sharp! The sharper your blade is, the cleaner the cut. The cleaner the cut, the better the seams. The better the seams, the better the armor! It is highly recommended to at least have a blade sharpener on hand to keep your blades keen (~$10 USD).
  4. Use a metal straight edge/ruler. These can be useful for making angled/beveled cuts, making straight long cuts, or even simply marking cut lines on the foam. These are a good investment. We’d recommend getting one around 18in long.
  5. Tracing templates. Templates can be traced onto foam using a ballpoint pen. However, if you find it hard to see the pen on your foam (e.g. black foam) you could switch to a white/silver permanent marker. Note however, that foam dries markers up fast. When using a pen, be careful not to tear into the foam.
  6. Buy a heat gun. No, hair dryer DOESN’T COUNT. It simply does not reach a high enough temperature to heat the foam evenly. Heat guns are needed for shaping curves into the foam, sealing it for the painting step, and various other foam tricks like scoring.
  7. Use something to keep templates down while tracing (e.g. push pins, something heavy). You don’t want them sliding around while you’re tracing them.
  8. KwikSeal Adhesive Caulk. This is useful for filling gaps in seams as well as smoothing out cut/fuzzy edges. Other similar options include foam clay, or air drying clay.
  9. Seal your foam. Use a heat gun to seal the outer foam layer, followed by applying a sealant coating (e.g. PlastiDip, LeakSeal, Mod Podge, Flexbond, etc.) before painting
  10. Craft/exacto blades work great for cutting EVA along with snap off blades. We like to keep some of both on hand, and use what seems to work best for the type of cut we’re going for. RandomRanger got a bulk craft blade set for ~$10 USD and would replace the blade once he was able to hear it slicing through, and he still has half the blades from the kit. ZP180 bought quality utility knives and a handful of X-acto knives with various blades and uses a blade sharpener and honing steel throughout the build process in order to keep her blades sharp.
  11. Dremel/rotary tools can be useful for smoothing out cut edges, making unique cuts, cutting out circles, or gouging out trenches. Some recommended bits are low and high grit sanding drums (e.g. 60 and 600 grit) for cutting out circles and smoothing edges, cutting wheels and stone grinding wheels (for trenches). Most accessory packs have plenty of pieces to get you started.
  12. For a smooth finish, EVA can be sanded like wood. Note: the higher the foam’s density the better it will sand.
  13. Shoe goo can be used behind seams to make armor super tough, just be aware that shoe goo needs a well ventilated environment and maybe an organic vapor respirator (24hr cure time).
  14. Have fun, and don’t rush it!
This was so helpful now I know all the things I need to use with foam to make my favorite spartan cosplay.
 

Matts Good Eye

New Member
Floor Tiles vs Rolls Visual

This image is to show that you can get similar quality regardless of foam type used. The trade-off is increased effort.

View attachment 286336
I
Tips/tools and misc. for working with foam
  1. Wear a respirator with a particulate filter or a particulate mask when sanding foam. Even though EVA is generally considered safe, if you’re sanding the foam it can create a fine dust that is not good for your respiratory system.
  2. Use Barge if you can. Hot glue is a common low cost, non-toxic choice of adhesive for bonding foam, however contact cement (e.g. Barge) is a stronger option that makes it easier to bond foam with minimal seams. Just note that contact cement needs good ventilation and/or an organic vapors respirator (~$30 USD).
  3. Keep your blades sharp! The sharper your blade is, the cleaner the cut. The cleaner the cut, the better the seams. The better the seams, the better the armor! It is highly recommended to at least have a blade sharpener on hand to keep your blades keen (~$10 USD).
  4. Use a metal straight edge/ruler. These can be useful for making angled/beveled cuts, making straight long cuts, or even simply marking cut lines on the foam. These are a good investment. We’d recommend getting one around 18in long.
  5. Tracing templates. Templates can be traced onto foam using a ballpoint pen. However, if you find it hard to see the pen on your foam (e.g. black foam) you could switch to a white/silver permanent marker. Note however, that foam dries markers up fast. When using a pen, be careful not to tear into the foam.
  6. Buy a heat gun. No, hair dryer DOESN’T COUNT. It simply does not reach a high enough temperature to heat the foam evenly. Heat guns are needed for shaping curves into the foam, sealing it for the painting step, and various other foam tricks like scoring.
  7. Use something to keep templates down while tracing (e.g. push pins, something heavy). You don’t want them sliding around while you’re tracing them.
  8. KwikSeal Adhesive Caulk. This is useful for filling gaps in seams as well as smoothing out cut/fuzzy edges. Other similar options include foam clay, or air drying clay.
  9. Seal your foam. Use a heat gun to seal the outer foam layer, followed by applying a sealant coating (e.g. PlastiDip, LeakSeal, Mod Podge, Flexbond, etc.) before painting
  10. Craft/exacto blades work great for cutting EVA along with snap off blades. We like to keep some of both on hand, and use what seems to work best for the type of cut we’re going for. RandomRanger got a bulk craft blade set for ~$10 USD and would replace the blade once he was able to hear it slicing through, and he still has half the blades from the kit. Fallen bought quality utility knives and a handful of X-acto knives with various blades and uses a blade sharpener and honing steel throughout the build process in order to keep her blades sharp.
  11. Dremel/rotary tools can be useful for smoothing out cut edges, making unique cuts, cutting out circles, or gouging out trenches. Some recommended bits are low and high grit sanding drums (e.g. 60 and 600 grit) for cutting out circles and smoothing edges, cutting wheels and stone grinding wheels (for trenches). Most accessory packs have plenty of pieces to get you started.
  12. For a smooth finish, EVA can be sanded like wood. Note: the higher the foam’s density the better it will sand.
  13. Shoe goo can be used behind seams to make armor super tough, just be aware that shoe goo needs a well ventilated environment and maybe an organic vapor respirator (24hr cure time).
  14. Have fun, and don’t rush it!
Does anyhow have rough estimates of use for making weapons? Or would molds and fillers be better for this?
 

Fallen

Active Member
Member DIN
S922
Generally speaking having mostly 10mm foam with a couple sheets of 6, 4, and 2mm covers most applications. Anything above 10mm you can sandwich the others together to create the final thickness for the base and use thinner foam to add details for most "standard sized" weapons (thinking AR, DMR, plasma rifle, etc.).
 
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