Master Chief - Mjolnir - Mark 6 - Halo 3 - 3D printable armor files

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
Wow that looks awesome. What infill were they printed?
I think I stayed around 20% for it all but the strength didn't come from the infill. When getting ready for print, I just make sure that the model has at least 3 or 4 outer layers making for a total of 6 to 8. With the outer layers alone, the piece ends up being a little over 1/8" to 1/4" thickness which is plenty when assembling armor.
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
I would imagine at the least 75 hours. But the real time killer isn't just the printing, but also the sanding and filling after it's done
75 hours? Oh sweet summer child, that might finish off a thigh.

The last helmet I've made was a cumulative 80+ hours printing at 0.2mm layer height and 60mm/s (fast) print speed.
 

Phauxelate

Active Member
75 hours? Oh sweet summer child, that might finish off a thigh.

The last helmet I've made was a cumulative 80+ hours printing at 0.2mm layer height and 80mm/s (fast) travel speed.
Well, It all depends on what printer you have and what settings it's on. But regardless, yeah it's going to take one heck of a time
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
Well, It all depends on what printer you have and what settings it's on. But regardless, yeah it's going to take one heck of a time
Based on the settings MoeSizzlac is quoting, for ~20% infill and 3-4 boundary layers I'd expect at least 20-25 days of continuous print times on a larger format printer like the Tevo Tornado or CR-10 on fast travel speeds and low resolution. That's without parts failures and timing your work and sleep schedule around removing finished pieces and starting new prints.
 

Kula

Member
Ok thats a challenge . Then i really wanna know the durarion the chest/body took
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
Ok thats a challenge . Then i really wanna know the durarion the chest/body took
Here, Take a look at this excel breakdown. Shows all of the prints. I didn't start keeping track of actual time vs estimated till mid way through. Torso takes around 81 and a half hours of printing and would be around 2 Spools total...so $44.00 give or take.

Untitled.jpg
 

Attachments

Here, Take a look at this excel breakdown. Shows all of the prints. I didn't start keeping track of actual time vs estimated till mid way through. Torso takes around 81 and a half hours of printing and would be around 2 Spools total...so $44.00 give or take.

View attachment 261548
sorry to revive a mostly dead thread but how is the torso assembled and everything attached to the under suit? I'm looking to start working on one of these kits soon and I am currently scaling it for the wearer to prep for when they are ready to start since I am building one for myself and a friend
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
sorry to revive a mostly dead thread
269677


Assuming you are using a SIMILAR UNDER-SUIT as I did, i just used 2" 8/32 screws that went from the inside of the armor, through the plastic covers and through pre-drilled holes in the armor I made:
20190507_202742.jpg 20190507_202803.jpg 20190507_202706.jpg Just finish them off with nuts and cut them. (the secret to cutting them is to mount the armor on fully, use the dremel to give them just a little notch, then undo the armor and finish the cut away from the plastic. That way the plastic won't melt from the heat)

For the torso, I use the screws to secure straps that buckle in around the sides. The straps are adjustable.
20190507_202712.jpg

And for the top, I have straps that can loosen quite a bit on the inside to allow my head to get through (you can't see it here but the inside is has an adjustable strap that can loosen on both sides.

20190507_202728.jpg

Hope that helps.
 

TurboCharizard

RMO & BCO
405th Regiment Officer
Community Staff
sorry to revive a mostly dead thread but how is the torso assembled and everything attached to the under suit? I'm looking to start working on one of these kits soon and I am currently scaling it for the wearer to prep for when they are ready to start since I am building one for myself and a friend
I've built a variant of this suit that uses several pieces as an "off the shelf" style of the files.

For the pieces attached directly to the suit I only have the shins, thighs, and biceps connected to the tech suit. These connections are done with clips and webbing that is on one side sewn to a patch on the suit and then epoxied to the armour. The shins and biceps are only clipped to the suit to maintain armour position on the body with respect to rotation, upholstery foam inserts are on the inside of the armour to pressure fit and keep the part in place.

The belt is a belt that's naturally held in place by my hips.

The chest separates along a midplane and there are four pairs of 3/4" parachute clips that buckle together. Again, having upholstery foam in positons along the chest, shoulders and back improves comfort and stops unwanted rotation due to the added weight of the CQB U/A.

The three boot sections are offset from a steel toed work boot with EVA foam spacers and have matching Velcro patches to make the armour sections removable for access (tying laces) and for reduced storage size.

59539735_1688548694622266_6918121943581327360_n.jpg


I'll likely be adding an extra sewn shoulder bell to improve the fit and further reduce unwanted rotation of the shoulder pieces (CQB plates are large and heavy). This bell will be snapped at several points along the tech suit shoulder and an elasticized strapping system across the back and chest to hold everything in place is my current thought process but hey, we'll see what happens.
 

Silentviper114

New Member
Hello all,

Just a generic question for those wiser than me. After an hour of searching and not coming up with results, I was wondering:

Has anyone made a 3D printable set of armor files for Halo 3 Master Chief?

I'd rather not re-invent the wheel if it has already been done but if it hasn't, do you guys have an interest in seeing one?

I can start with the high def and ultra high def pepakura files posted by Art Andrews and take it from there.



Update: 5/31/18

I uploaded my un-scaled files on thingiverse. This is not spliced up for the printer bed. It has both 2 versions of the same armor. Version 2 has increased mobility and I also fixed some geometry problems.

Update: 6/7/18:

I uploaded the chopped up files on thingiverse. These files should print on an 8x10x8 print bed no problem. It is currently sized to 5'10 185Lbs person.
View attachment 256034
Can you size it up for a person that is 145 Ib and 5'8?
 

MoeSizzlac

Active Member
Can you size it up for a person that is 145 Ib and 5'8?
Not really. It is tough to scale to a body I don't have in front of me. If you had a 3d version of yourself, then it would be easier. If you don't, no real worries. At 5'8" and 145, most of the armor would retain the same length but the internal diameters will change dramatically.

There are many ways you can go about scaling this, but I'll give you 2 options to start:

1) I use Blender. I have a figure that is pretty close to my size (I made measurements and everything) and I usually scale the armor to it and make adjustments on the fly after printing.

Blender is set to metric as default. All measurements are in mm.Here's what I would do if I were you. Say you want to print a forearm piece. Take a measurement of your forearm where you want the armor to start and stop. Then take a measurement of you forearm at its widest point. Create a cylinder the same size and width and scale the armor to that size. Youtube and google are a great resource for blender.

268228-ab61d4aff1e31b8abd46f0670b65e54b.jpg


Just note that the lower left side shows radius and depth in mm.

268230-9ca6f75f3663c13318c72c4b1d3a3f2c.jpg


Also, on the right side, if you are missing all that great information under the word "Transform". Look for a small "+" sign and that'll bring it all up.

Then when your cylinder is ready and close to your forearm size, import the armor,

268232-02855fb8ae9cf26d370f3236b97c60a5.jpg


Select the armor by right clicking it, then press the key "s" to scale. If you just press s, it will scale on all 3 axis. However, if you press "s" then "z", it will scale on only the z axis.

This is a very basic version of scaling and can be used over and over again.

2) I've heard others love the tool Armorsmith (The Armored Garage). For 30 dollars, you can basically do the same thing as Blender but in a more simplified way. I'm not 100% sure about it but I have read that others have had luck with it.
 

xXDashIVXx

Well-Known Member
Not really. It is tough to scale to a body I don't have in front of me. If you had a 3d version of yourself, then it would be easier. If you don't, no real worries. At 5'8" and 145, most of the armor would retain the same length but the internal diameters will change dramatically.

There are many ways you can go about scaling this, but I'll give you 2 options to start:

1) I use Blender. I have a figure that is pretty close to my size (I made measurements and everything) and I usually scale the armor to it and make adjustments on the fly after printing.

Blender is set to metric as default. All measurements are in mm.Here's what I would do if I were you. Say you want to print a forearm piece. Take a measurement of your forearm where you want the armor to start and stop. Then take a measurement of you forearm at its widest point. Create a cylinder the same size and width and scale the armor to that size. Youtube and google are a great resource for blender.

View attachment 270041

Just note that the lower left side shows radius and depth in mm.

View attachment 270042

Also, on the right side, if you are missing all that great information under the word "Transform". Look for a small "+" sign and that'll bring it all up.

Then when your cylinder is ready and close to your forearm size, import the armor,

View attachment 270043

Select the armor by right clicking it, then press the key "s" to scale. If you just press s, it will scale on all 3 axis. However, if you press "s" then "z", it will scale on only the z axis.

This is a very basic version of scaling and can be used over and over again.

2) I've heard others love the tool Armorsmith (The Armored Garage). For 30 dollars, you can basically do the same thing as Blender but in a more simplified way. I'm not 100% sure about it but I have read that others have had luck with it.
3) eyeball with a ruler
 
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