Soft Parts Interesting cooling system

wolf

Member
all you need is a pump, tubing, and resevoir. in the backplate section of the armor you have more than enough room to create a heatsink that will draw the heat out of the water. [attachment=4283:cooler.bmp]
 

Brokenchord

New Member
Yes i was thing it this last week but i didnt said when the idea come out! (1 year ago) :rolleyes :p No i am telling you the truth ! Honestly!
life keeps me more end more busy! exams, tests e.t.c. College staff!
 

Brokenchord

New Member
You are all very far end away from what i am thinking!
I will start building it if i am lucky in 3 weeks from now (College final exams!!!! ouff)! ! End only if i found an optimal thin plastic tube ! AND KICK OUT!!! :D
I will make a freaking tutorial ! :cool:

This is more or less close with what i am thinking Space suit cooling system
I am not going to disappoint you guys!


all you need is a pump, tubing, and resevoir. in the backplate section of the armor you have more than enough room to create a heatsink that will draw the heat out of the water. Attached File cooler.bmp ( 729.05K ) Number of downloads: 15


Hm! i don't thing so :cautious:
I will make the cooling system in separately sectors ( Fore example right leg, left leg,right hand,left hand torso,back,head) with a therm sensor (therm-resistor) in each one of them! In order to secure the fact that each part of the body will have the right temperature! No i am not going crazy! I all keep the cost very low!
 

wolf

Member
Brokenchord said:
You are all very far end away from what i am thinking!
I will start building it if i am lucky in 3 weeks from now (College final exams!!!! ouff)! ! End only if i found an optimal thin plastic tube ! AND KICK OUT!!! :D
I will make a freaking tutorial ! :cool:

This is more or less close with what i am thinking Space suit cooling system
I am not going to disappoint you guys!


all you need is a pump, tubing, and resevoir. in the backplate section of the armor you have more than enough room to create a heatsink that will draw the heat out of the water. Attached File cooler.bmp ( 729.05K ) Number of downloads: 15


Hm! i don't thing so :cautious:
I will make the cooling system in separately sectors ( Fore example right leg, left leg,right hand,left hand torso,back,head) with a therm sensor (therm-resistor) in each one of them! In order to secure the fact that each part of the body will have the right temperature! No i am not going crazy! I all keep the cost very low!


maybe you'll keep the cost low, but your forgetting the added weight factor, and the fact that if you keep your core cool you dont need a cooling thing for your extremities i.e. arms legs. then you have to think about practicality, in a nasa space suit the tubes everywhere help with blood flow, haveing an interconnecting cooling suit, unless you really want to wear a unitard which is not all that comfortable, would mean more time connecting all the peices, which unless you have a special valve system in place would mean refilling the unit everytime its conncected.

I realize i might sound like im dogging your idea. i just dont thinks it practical...i do hope you prove me wrong. but the best solution is most often the most simple.
 
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UNSC Leatherneck

Well-Known Member
Here's an idea. A cooling collar. The carotid artery runs up either side of the neck and supplies blood to the brain. They are large bore arteries and cooling the blood there would go a long way to keeping you cool. A collar could be smaller and easier to integrate into an undersuit. Have a reservoir of water that is circulated. Ice water may work, but you'd have to change it after a period of time as your body heat warms the water in the system, depending on the temperature and how much you're exerting yourself. Or we could develop a system that includes a unit to radiate heat to the surrounding air. With that, all you'd have to do was make sure the batteries are good; no ice-water changes required. While we're talking about cooling and such, how about putting a water bladder (ie. camelback) in the suit. Run the tubing up to the helmet so the wearer can easily take a drink. A person exerting themselves in a hot environment can dehydrate quickly. 2 liter water bladders are readily available and are not expensive. Like they say in the military: Hydrate, or die!
 

centerside

Well-Known Member
I know what you mean, I found that out while watching TV lol! That's gona be so awesome when it's finished, but why should you make it that every part has to have it's own system? I agree with tenacioust183, I like your aidea but you can make as like, upper body, and lower body systems only. I oersonally think that every part having it's own system would be too heavy and large, might not fit.

PS: Good luck in your tests
 

Brokenchord

New Member
Oh! god!
Calm down you guys! :rolleyes
When i am talking about separate parts i don't mean end separate cooling systems! The cooling unit will be one (a water spu or probably two). But the water flow in each part will be different, depending on its own temperature! High temperature also high flow! The flow adjustment will be done by step-motor valves. Controlled by the therm-sensors end also from the processor circuit (a cheap electronic kit!) step-motor valves end therm-sensors are also cheap thank god! :jam:

Yeah! pretty sweet! End also fuc.....g! hard to build! A very ambitious dream!
Well i will hammer on this!
 

centerside

Well-Known Member
Oh NOW i get it.

Now that one will be managable hehe. anymore details? do you mean like connecting all the tubes (with the valves, like multiple tubes connecting into the cooling unit) to the cooling unit, or like only one round of tubing for the whole suit (using only one tube all around the suit from 1 end to to the other)

A very ambitious dream, might end up not being a dream any more ( :D )
 

Deadguy

Well-Known Member
Personally, my investigation into the Nasa Spacesuits indicated that they were specifically designed to be "constant flow" systems with no "stand-alone" cooling. Basically, think in terms of a tube being connected from the cooling suit to the shuttle itself, constantly circulating the cool water into the suit.

There's also a similar system on the market that focuses on temporary stand-alone cycling systems, where you recharge it intermittantly, like say every 10 minutes you get all the fluid recycled at a recharging station.

Another version is a cycling stand alone.. where you'd have an icebox that had water pumped through it. It's cooling effects last as long as the ice does.

This one we saw linked here is a nice variant on a quasi-stand alone system. Where the "recharge station" is merely a detachable spray cannister. However, it claims a 2-hour maximum usage. I don't know if that's using water or not.

I keep thinking in terms of recharge stations personally.. But what if we simply had accessble iceboxes? Then our recharge station consits of an ice chest. What if our costumes had accessible ice boxes we could refill whenever we had some ice to do it with? Or better yet.. a blue-ice box system.

Conceivably, we could have an ice chest with blue-ice packets in them. We'd just need to do something like have the backpack incorporate a removable piece that contains the icebox.

On an icebox system, there's not much point in determining the various cooling levels needed for each part of the body. Basically, it's an entropy system where the instant you start it, your temperature rises until you want a refill of ice. If you've got a single water tube making the rounds, then there's a requirement to cycle it through the coollant system (ice box) and back out again.

Separating the system on an icebox suit is kind of an unneeded thing.. if the body is cool in an area, it won't warm the water much.. if it's hot, the water is reaching it to cool it down, just like it needs to.

Delivering more coolant to a specific area "On-the-fly" seems unneeded... you could y-split tubes to bring-in additional tubing to areas that are determined to be troublespots. Ultimately though, ideally, you'd develop an arterial network, where you run direct supply "cooling" lines all over the suit and then use common tubing lines for "return" water that's not directly against the wearer.. Incorporate a good heatsink station on the return lines, and you'd be in great shape.

That'd be a lot of tubing that's not being used to cool things down, but it means the system could cool more evenly.. rather than say.. applying maximum cooling to the first area, and the last area always getting the body-warmed water. It would also mean your icepack would last considerably longer because the water hitting it would have already expelled some of it's heat.

The big thing with these suits is ensuring that the tubing isn't compressed/pinched because that'll hurt the pump over time (or immediately on a cheesy pump). That means stronger tubing (or reinforced tubing) at least at flex points.

I could see using a circulation system where the cold water is introduced in stages.. but if the cooling isn't introduced to the water, the water is heating up, because that's it's function as your body's heatsink. Trust me.. full cooling is the only setting worth a hill of beans after the first 10-15 minutes (if that.. depending on how how the environment is).
 

Loess

Well-Known Member
I just got my heat transfer books back out, it's been a while since I took that in school though. Give me some time for relearning forced convection in tubes. The vest that has coolant supplied to different zones equally is the design I was looking at.

The current plan (subject to modification, physics is a cruel mistress) is to use a 12 volt cordless tool battery for power. That will be running a circulatory pump and thermoelectric cooler module to move the heat out of the water into a heat-sink where a fan can move the heat into the air.

Give me time to run the numbers on sizing everything, I have to relearn it as I go. :whistle:
 

UNSC Leatherneck

Well-Known Member
Loess said:
I just got my heat transfer books back out, it's been a while since I took that in school though. Give me some time for relearning forced convection in tubes. The vest that has coolant supplied to different zones equally is the design I was looking at.

The current plan (subject to modification, physics is a cruel mistress) is to use a 12 volt cordless tool battery for power. That will be running a circulatory pump and thermoelectric cooler module to move the heat out of the water into a heat-sink where a fan can move the heat into the air.

Give me time to run the numbers on sizing everything, I have to relearn it as I go. :whistle:
Wow! You read my mind. Just the other night I was pricing thermoelectric peltier junctions. Mind you, I have no formal background in thermodynamics, so I was just going with the trial and error route. Power was the main thing I was concerned about, but a cordless tool battery is a great idea. It would be cool to see someone who has a background in this kind of thing make one.
 
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Loess

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm not really a thermo/fluids guy. I took the machine design course path, but all Mech E's had to take thermo, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. I do have my books and notes, so I can muddle through the design with a bit less trial and error. I already have two peltier junctions, and can mock up the circulator with a garden fountain pump, tubing and a bucket. I never have found a good pump to use for the final cordless system though.
 

wolf

Member
for a pump i was going use a either a car wiper fluid pump or take one out of those annoying office waterfalls.....but i just had an idea that basically would cut out pumps entirely, would be by far the cheapest, but would def need some testing....when i think of a way to explain it right ill edit this or do a post. but basically let the have a shut off valve to stop water flow and when the water in the tubes heat up do to body temp open the valve and the temp diff of the water would cause cool water sitting in the other half of the tubes (cooled by ice packs or whatnot) to start to flow in replacing the warmed up water. when you feel the cool water in place close the valve, actually though in retrospect, if you have enough tubing going through a heatsink or through cooling by icepack, it should automatically start circulating, as long as it had the power to cool the water as it flowed through.

and basically unless some one builds a small fridge unit all personal cooling system are going to need a recharge station. weather it was switching out ice packs or water all together.
 

Loess

Well-Known Member
The problems with using natural convection in a system like this is that there isn't enough mass of water to really get it cycling, there isn't enough height change through the system, and the friction in the small tubes is a whole lot more than the buoyancy forces that would be needed to move the water. It's a cool idea, but doesn't work well unless the system is really large. I had considered a washer fluid pump, but I think that the power consumption would be pretty high. I might wind up making my own peristaltic pump and integrating that into the chiller block.
 

ryan f

New Member
just an idea. i think every one else has already thought of it, i just suggest it because anyone building a new set of armor can incorperate air vents and fans more seemlessly. Also has anyone though of the idea of thinner underarmour around the torso and mounting the hose in the chest peice (one peice singlet version of chest piece). i know this doesn't help with your head overheating but with my understanding that ive collected off scuba diving it will keep your appendages cooled to a certain degree (almost all bodyheat can be regulated by controlling the temperature of the chest and back).

i like the idea of the neck coller , may i suggest adding to that method something to cool the arteries semiexposed in your arpits.

i am open to creative critacism plese doublecheck my idea and reply.
 

Loess

Well-Known Member
That's very close to my plan, I just have to figure out if it's possible to fit a large enough heat sink into the armor to dissipate 500 watts of heat without raising the temperature of the sink to where it's dangerous to wear. Don't want to burn the user or melt their armor. The hose will be built into the underarmor, and cool most of the torso. I've got some tubing and a fountain pump now, so I can test water temperatures for comfort, and get an idea of how to size the cooler.
 

ryan f

New Member
Loess said:
That's very close to my plan, I just have to figure out if it's possible to fit a large enough heat sink into the armor to dissipate 500 watts of heat without raising the temperature of the sink to where it's dangerous to wear. Don't want to burn the user or melt their armor. The hose will be built into the underarmor, and cool most of the torso. I've got some tubing and a fountain pump now, so I can test water temperatures for comfort, and get an idea of how to size the cooler.
500watts i seriously dont think you need to remove that much heat also were the fin like area on the back of the armour is well large enough to mount most radators.

i also thought of mounting an 80mm fan in each shoulder ridge (on an angle so that it fits ) and venting air down to the back, ive prototyped it and just by the air movement through the vents ive felt notacibly cooler hooking it in with the watercooling you can get very very cold. ive been personally creating my radiator from aluminum fins and a copper pipe system running inside the armour, not the under armour, and i have to say itis a very effective system. ( i use an underarmour which is made of a material similar to a wetsuits except lets heat pass through it , have to look name up)

(
 
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