WinterHuntsman’s ODST build WIP

xXDashIVXx

Sr Member
I use bondo(body filler), bondo resin, and bondo fibreglass cloth. Works great for me :b

I am pretty sure this is the resperator I am using, and not only is it cheap, but it works great. If you can smell it, you are breathing in the bad stuff, be it vapors, chemicals, or particles. This will keep everything out!

 
Ok some good news. I start adding resin to the helmet Monday! I got everything I need so far, just missing the resin part which I was going to pick up today. I was going to start tomorrow but we have family coming over and one of them wants to see the helmet before I start coating it.
Im planning on doing the inside first because I feel like that will give the helmet some support when I do the outside.
What I was wondering is how many coats do you guys recommend? and what kind of brush? I got those black foam ones, but I was wondering if it would be better to grab normal paint brushes for this project.
 

he4thbar

Well-Known Member
What I was wondering is how many coats do you guys recommend? and what kind of brush? I got those black foam ones, but I was wondering if it would be better to grab normal paint brushes for this project.
Typical answer is 2-3 coats. I didn't know doing the inside coat was a thing so I just did 2 resin coats on the outside and after your fiberglass cloth/ it there will be resin on the inside anyway. Also I could be wrong but some people have said that the foam brushes melt from the heat of chemical reactions so I went with regular cheap bristle 1"-1 1/2" brushes.
 
Typical answer is 2-3 coats. I didn't know doing the inside coat was a thing so I just did 2 resin coats on the outside and after your fiberglass cloth/ it there will be resin on the inside anyway. Also I could be wrong but some people have said that the foam brushes melt from the heat of chemical reactions so I went with regular cheap bristle 1"-1 1/2" brushes.
Ok so I’ll pick up some normal brushes then (I assume a lot of them as I don’t think they will wash out).
So is this the correct procedure?
0. Set up in a ventilated area and put on Saftey gear plus work clothes (I have an old lab coat I will use)
1. Pour some resin into a small cup
2. Put the correct number of drops of the catalyst it comes at the correct ratio
3. After mixing the solution start painting it on
4. If the one cup is not enough to do the layer, repeat 1-3 until layer is complete
5. Repeat steps to do a total of 2-3 layers.

I assume there is more I have to do after this before I can go into sanding and painting.
Also since I should probably fill in some of the gaps in the helmet before doing this, should I use some painters tape or glue some scrap card stock in behind the crack to cover it?
 

he4thbar

Well-Known Member
I'll do my best to respond to that.
-Yes a lot of brushes(10 to start). The outside coat you will probably only need 1-2 brushes per layer.
0- Yep sounds good, I didn't use a lab coat but thats smart thinking, hope you have lots of disposable gloves.
1-Smart, I bought a small 2oz measuring cup from walmart to measure out my resin before pouring and mixing in a red solo cup.
2-Yes per oz its I believe 11-12 drops of hardner.
3-5: tip of advice is maybe even buy some dollar store or walmart painting brushes for the very small areas like the ears. Also once you have a layer down and on it you will want to watch and smooth it over because it will "drip" or move down the surface and don't want any globs you have to clean up later like I did.

After you are done with just the resin coats you will need to either fiberglass cloth or matt the inside. that is where you mix the resin and coat small sheets of fiberglass cloth or matt and line the inside. Check the tutorial index. Once you fiberglass cloth/matt the inside (2 layers) you can rondo the inside of the helmet if you so choose(look at the tutorials again). I am waiting to sand until after I have fiberglass clothed and rondod the inside of my helmet (hopefully this friday...) because after you fiberglass cloth/matt the inside it is extremely durable and a hefty product and will withstand sanding without budging.

I never filled the inside because I will just bondo after the resin/rondo it, which is the step you want to do after sanding down the resin. Bondo the outside of the helmet and sand it down to a smooth surface. xXDashIVXx would give you the advice on going very light coverage with the bondo or you will be sanding for ages.

Anything I missed others can chip in.
 

Tyrgam3r

Member
Last time I resined a pepakura costume, I used popsicle sticks to help keep the shape while applying the outer layer. And also I was using fiberglass cloth and got lazy and instead of cutting up a bunch of pieces, I just hot glued big pieces on and then resined after so I could make sure I didn't have to go back and forth and get resin on my gloves or have to keep mixing smaller batches.

But that's just my technique.
 

he4thbar

Well-Known Member
Last time I resined a pepakura costume, I used popsicle sticks to help keep the shape while applying the outer layer. And also I was using fiberglass cloth and got lazy and instead of cutting up a bunch of pieces, I just hot glued big pieces on and then resined after so I could make sure I didn't have to go back and forth and get resin on my gloves or have to keep mixing smaller batches.
As a fellow lazy man, I wish I would have thought of that.. I think coverage will be a little different with that method but seconded on Popsicle sticks.
 

xXDashIVXx

Sr Member
Generally the way to get the strongest pepakura helmet is to mix in small batches. Around an ounce at a time is good. Make sure your helmet is supported so it cant cave in, and some sort of stand to hold the helmet up is a good idea. Brush on a very thin coat of resin to give the helmet a "wet" look. Let it dry, but make sure there are no drips. Then do the same thing but make it a little thicker of a coat. Next Do the inside. You can slush it around instead of using a brush, just get even coverage. Then stipple the cloth with some kore resin. You can then rondo the inside if you want. It isnt necessary, but if you are wearing the helmet instead of making casts, it is a good idea for extra support, but it does make it heavier... then you can bondo the outside and sand
 

he4thbar

Well-Known Member
You can then rondo the inside if you want. It isnt necessary, but if you are wearing the helmet instead of making casts, it is a good idea for extra support, but it does make it heavier...
Along with this, do you have to sand the inside as much or at all if you rondo the inside?
 

xXDashIVXx

Sr Member
Along with this, do you have to sand the inside as much or at all if you rondo the inside?
If you slush it around good and keep it moving until it cant move anymore, it will be as smooth as the inside of the helmet. You may need to do some sanding depending on the design/how you fibreglass, but you can always cut away the fibreglass if this is the case. My helmet had the visor not attatched for whatever reason, so I had to cut out alot of little squares and use those as "tabs" to glue the visor to the helmet. This led to fibreglass and paper sticking out to the inside of the helmet, making it harder to rondo and impossible to wear. I could trim it, but the hole is the size of my neck currently and I will eventually cast it, so there is no reason to wear it... if you dont add too much hardener, and add a little bit more resin than bondo you should be fine
 
Ok so since I order the materials for the next part of the helmet they have yet to arrive so nothing to report there until the resin and mat arrives.
The chest plate is looking good though and th back requires some make shift design fix. The back shoulder straps are raised more than the thickness of my foam so I built a box like structure on it to make it thicker but still make it flexible.
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It’s hard to describe this attempt on my 2nd chest plate. Not only does it look 100x better it feels better. Like it’s more solid and built right. It’s hard to explain but for anyone who works with foam, you may understand.
 
Ok I got all the supplies I need for applying resin to the helmet. So I will be applying the resin tomorrow. A little nervous as I only got one shot to get it right. Is it better to do the out side or inside first? I feel like if I did the inside I could avoid using popsicle sticks for support. Also are the popsicle sticks really needed? The helmet feels solid and I don’t think applying resin will make it bend under its weight. Unless there is a warping issue then I would understand the need for popsicle sticks.
 

xXDashIVXx

Sr Member
They are by no means necessary, just a precaution. It really stinks to have done all that work and then something for whatever reason goes wrong. I usually do a very thin coat on the outside and then work my way in, but the resin can get very heavy, especially if you start at the top of the helmet or dont let the bottom half dry first.
 
Ok resin work got delayed. There is an extreme heat advisory going on and only place I can work that’s well aired out is the garage. Since I don’t think the resin will like this heat I’m going to wait for a cooler day. I’ll post an update when I get started. For now I’ll work on the chest more.
 

Frozensnot

Well-Known Member
If you want to be extra careful when applying resin, work in small batches and apply the resin onto one area of the helmet at a time. Let the resin cure and move onto another area. Don't start at the crown unless you put on very light layers of resin. Like xXDashIVXx said, you don't really need supports. They are mostly there to keep the shape of the piece intact. Just put on very thin layers of resin in separate areas and you should be fine.
 
Today’s the day guys.
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Sorry I don’t have photos of the chest up yet. There was an issue with it setting so I had to cut out sections of the shoulder strap part and create new one. Once that is all done I’ll get photos up. All these little gaps in foam are driving me nuts. With a little scrap foam I’m closing them up but it takes time.
 

he4thbar

Well-Known Member
Today’s the day guys.
View attachment 274449
Sorry I don’t have photos of the chest up yet. There was an issue with it setting so I had to cut out sections of the shoulder strap part and create new one. Once that is all done I’ll get photos up. All these little gaps in foam are driving me nuts. With a little scrap foam I’m closing them up but it takes time.
Sorry to hear about the chest hope to see pics soon. Good luck with the fiberglass! It's not fun but once you get done with it you will be amazed with how strong your helmet is. Also be sure to pre cut your strips of fiberglass before you start putting them inside the helmet, that way you don't waste resin.
Also wear the gloves when you are cutting the mat, don't wanna be like me and have prickly fingers for the next week because you forgot to wear gloves when cutting it up.
 
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First coat on out side done and inside matting is drying. It’s a mess in there but it should work.
83BA759B-A6D8-4E36-BA13-4258F8D906CB.jpeg

Got a few spots on the inside to hit but I’m going to let it dry so I stop snagging stuff around the inside.
Also got lots of little fibers stuck to the outside on accident but I don’t think those will do any harm.

Edit- and it is done. I missed a few spots on the mat with the resin so I’ll have to hit those spots on my second coat on the inside. Going to try and get the rest of the coats done later this week.
 
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